Phenobarbital

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phenobarbital

[¦fē·nō′bär·bə‚tȯl]
(pharmacology)
C12H12N2O3 A crystalline compound, 5-ethyl-5-phenylbarbituric acid, with a slightly bitter taste, melting at 174-178°C; soluble in water, alcohol, chloroform, and ether; used in medicine as a long-acting sedative, anticonvulsant, and hypnotic.

Phenobarbital

 

(trade name, Luminal), a medicinal preparation of the barbiturate group. Taken in powder or tablet form, phenobarbital is a long-acting soporific and is used in the treatment of such conditions as epilepsy and vascular spasms. Phenobarbital may be combined, in tablet form, with various other substances, including analgesic and spasmolytic preparations (for example, Andipal, Camphodal, or Paluphin).

References in periodicals archive ?
Phenobarbitol, one of the oldest antiepileptic drugs, is associated with which of the following side effects?
Anticonvulsants: acetazolamide, cabamazepine, phenytoin, phenobarbitol, primidone
Planning to catch the last shuttle for the Hale-Bopp comet, eager to leave behind the "containers" that are their human forms, each member has ingested applesauce or pudding laced with phenobarbitol.
However, the very difference that the penis, unmoored like the tube of phenobarbitol, wants to claim - a difference that would glorify its possessor while humiliating the one who had to acknowledge his separation - turns, in its moment of climax, to a metonymic general glory.
Wesson, my colleague since the late 1960s when we developed the phenobarbitol substitution and withdrawal techniques used as the basis for the Haight Ashbury Free Clinics' outpatient detox program, has always been at the forefront of medication research for the treatment of addictive disease.
Synergistic acceleration of thyroid hormone degradation by phenobarbitol and the peroxisome proliferation receptor agonist WY14643.
Ethosuximide 40-100 mcg/mL >200 mcg/mL Phenobarbitol 15-40 mcg/mL >60 mcg/mL Phenytoin 10-20 mcg/mL >40 mcg/mL Toxicity may occur at lower concentrations in presence of low albumin.