Philochorus


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Philochorus

(fĭlŏk`ōrəs), fl. 3d cent. B.C., Greek historian. He wrote extensively on Greek religious customs. Philochorus is probably the best known of the many chroniclers of events in Athens and surrounding Attica. His Atthis is a 17-volume history of the region from mythological times to 260 B.C. In 250 B.C., Philochorus was murdered by political enemies.
References in periodicals archive ?
35) Since the context in Athenaeus' quotation of 120 is explicitly that of a symposium, if one reads 120 and 121 together or one after the other, the same context is easily suggested, especially because the quotation of Philochorus FGrHist 328 F 172 in Athenaeus 14.
And Philochorus says that when the ancients pour libations they do not always sing the dithyrambs, but whenever they pour libations, they do so, singing of Dionysus amid wine and drunkenness, Apollo quietly and with good order.
123) However, Plutarch also cites the demythologizing Attic historian, Philochorus (fourth-third century B.
On the ephebic oath and the Aglaurion, see Philochorus in FGrH 328 F105.
The actual source of the archon date could be the Atthis of Philochorus (third century B.
Jacoby's view of the Atthides, the local histories of Athens, as polemical works whose main intention was to reverse the bias of the most recent predecessor, is becoming less fashionable:(63) many of the local historians were men whom we might want to classify as antiquarians rather than historians, but it appears that Androtion in the fourth century and Philochorus in the third used the form of a local history as a means of writing serious and detailed histories of their own time.
Philochorus says that they [= rhapsodes] were thus called on account of the putting together [syntithem] and stitching [rhapto] of the song [aoide].
More tantalizing is that in conjunction with this Philochorus then cites a fragment attributed, perhaps wrongly, to Hesiod (F 357 MW):
Others would have Plato referring to the traditional story (first in Philochorus apud Diogenes Laertius 9.
The new orthodoxy is that the homogalaktes or gennetai who were guaranteed phratry membership by the law of Philochorus 328 F 35 are the homogalaktes who are represented as members of a village or extended household in Arist.
While there is no other hint in the Periegesis that Pausanias used Philochorus, there are better grounds for accepting Philochorus than Phylarchus as his source for this period.
As far as Pausanias' later sources are concerned, we are on less firm ground, but the balance is certainly in favour of Hieronymus of Cardia, and possibly Philochorus and Aratus.