Phocylides


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Phocylides

(fəsĭl`ĭdēz), fl. 6th cent. B.C., Greek poet, b. Miletus. His gnomic (aphoristic) verses exist in fragments.
References in periodicals archive ?
As the Greeke tongue is made famous and eloquent by Homer, Hesiod, Euripedes, AEschylus, Sophocles, Pindarus, Phocylides, and Aristophanes; and the Latine tongue by Virgil, Ovid, Horace, Silius Italicus, Lucanus, Lucretius, Ausonius, and Claudianus: so the English tongue is mightily enriched and gorgeously invested in rare ornaments and resplendent abiliments by Sir Philip Sidney, Spenser, Daniel, Drayton, Warner, Shakespeare, Marlowe, and Chapman (Meres, 1933, [1598], p.
Gnomic poetry is most commonly associated with the 6th-century-BC poets Solon and Simonides and with the elegiac couplets of Theognis and Phocylides.
Another problematic intertextual issue is the relationship between Semonides' poem on women and Phocylides fr.
If Phocylides genuinely had before him Semonides' colorful descriptions of the filthy Pig-woman (7.
The normal specimens, which we shall pass over quickly, are Phocylides (114 kilometers diameter) and Nasmyth (77 km), two forgettable flat-floored ring plains that look like the sole and heel of a shoe.
Another Dutch astronomer, John Phocylides Holwarda, found the star to be bright once again in the winter of 1638-39 and realized that its appearances were likely to repeat.