Texas Root Rot

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Texas Root Rot

 

(also cotton root rot), a very dangerous plant disease caused by the imperfect soil fungus Ozonium om-nivorum; it is an object of quarantine. The disease attacks and destroys the root systems of more than 2,000 species of plants. The leaves turn yellow, wilt, and quickly shrivel. Texas root rot is common in the United States and Mexico, where it seriously damages cotton, alfalfa, fruit trees, and ornamentals. The causative agent of Texas root rot is spread by soil particles, planting materials (tubers, roots, bulbs), and packing materials. The method of control is quarantine.

References in periodicals archive ?
Relacion entre condiciones de suelo y manejo de huertas de nogal Pecanero carya Illiinoensis Koch con la dinamica de la pudricion texana, causada por Phymatotrichum omnivorum Duggar.
Cell wall degrading enzymes proeduced by the phytopathogenic fungus Phymatotrichum omnivorum.
The extracellular plant cell wall degrading enzymes of Phymatotrichum omnivorum and the effect of different carbon sources on the production of these enzymes were investigated.
Phymatotrichum omnivorum attacks many field crop plants of economic importance.
It has improved levels for resistance to phymatotrichum root rot [caused by Phymatotrichum omnivorum (Shear) Dug.
Meloidogyne incognita (Kofoid & White) Chitwood, the fusarium wilt-root-knot nematode complex; Phymatotrichum omnivorum (Shear) Dug.