Picturesque movement

Picturesque movement

A reaction to the Classical Revival Style architecture that included irregularly planned landscapes, follies, grottos, and asymmetrical buildings, mostly in the Italianate style.

Picturesque Movement

A movement established by a group of architects from about 1840 to 1900, particularly in Europe, wedded to the concept that architectural ideals should look away from formal Classical architecture and instead should embrace the romanticized past. The term “Picturesque” is not indicative of a particular architectural style, but is suggestive of a number of styles or modes of architecture that were related to the romanticized past, including: Exotic Revival, Gothic Revival, Italianate style, Queen Anne style, Richardsonian Romanesque style, Second Empire style, Stick style, Swiss Cottage architecture.
References in periodicals archive ?
Apart from severely damaging the views south from long sections of the Pumlumon ridge their proposed development site also lies alongside the infant Wye, a river often linked to the C18th Picturesque Movement.
The fifth and most picturesque movement is "Dream of a Witches' Sabbath.
The first major tour undertaken by William Gilpin, the leading theorist of the picturesque movement, was along the Wye Valley, giving rise in 1782 to Observations on the River Wye .
Ann Bermingham describes the picturesque movement as an "imaginative appropriation of the countryside by a class already responsible for its territorial appropriation" (Bermingham 72).
The boat trips were organised to allow the followers of the picturesque movement to enjoy the Wye's dramatic scenery and the remains of Tintern Abbey.
Isenstadt shows how the design of small houses became part of the architectural repertoire through the picturesque movement and particularly J.
Others who came to Wales during the picturesque movement were the English romantic painter Joseph Turner and the poet Felicia Hemans.
Hill is one of those people who sees modernism as being a development of the picturesque movement of the early nineteenth century, and as such is some kind of bastard son of the Ecole des Beaux-Arts when going through one of its romantic phases.