Pinkster Day

Pinkster Day

Between May 10 and June 13; 50 days after Easter
When Pentecost (Whitsunday) became part of the Christian calendar in northern Europe, the name underwent numerous transformations. In Germany it became Pfingsten, and the Dutch called it Pinkster. When the Dutch settled in New York, they called the feast of Pentecost "Pinkster Day."
By the beginning of the 19th century, Albany had become a center for this celebration, which took place on Capitol, or "Pinkster," Hill and consisted of a week-long carnival dominated by the city's African-American population. It is said that their African-inspired dancing and music horrified the staid Dutch settlers, and by 1811 Pinkster Day had been legally prohibited by the New York state legislature.
SOURCES:
AAH-2007, p. 381
BkFest-1937, p. 244
DaysCustFaith-1957, p. 162
DictDays-1988, p. 89
FolkAmerHol-1999, p. 245
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References in periodicals archive ?
Pinkster Day, the Dutch name for Pentecost, was celebrated with much rejoicing and riotous activity among the Dutch in New Netherland.
Like the garb of King Charles on Pinkster days, the clothing of the "ragman" was the deliberate, festive exaggeration of the African-American cultural principles that animated slave apparel, particularly on Sundays.
We find other manifestations of African drumming in the Sunday dance and music sessions in Congo Square in ante-bellum New Orleans; in Revolutionary and Civil War fife-and-drum bands; at Pinkster Days in Albany, New York, and at Governor's Days in Hartford, Connecticut, where marching ensembles included large sections of drums and metal percussion instruments; and in the drum-and-fife blues tradition of the Southern United States and in Barbados (Brown).