Pipistrellus


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Pipistrellus

 

a genus of bats of the suborder Microchiroptera. The body is 3.5–10 cm long. There are approximately 40 species of pipistrelles, distributed in the tropical and temperate latitudes of Eurasia, as well as in North America, Madagascar, Australia, and New Guinea. Five species are found in the USSR, including Pipistrellus pipistrellus, P. nathusi, and P. kü hli. P. pipistrellus, which weighs 3–6 g, is distributed in the southern and, partly, the central zone of the USSR; it lives in man-made structures and is rarely encountered in natural shelters. P. nathusi is found predominantly in the central part of the European USSR, and P. kü hli is distributed in the Crimea, Transcaucasia, and Turkmenia. Pipistrelles appear at nightfall for feeding; they feed on small insects.

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Tree roosting ecology of reproductive female eastern pipistrelles, Pipistrellus subflavus, in Indiana.
Vitali (1924) reported the presence of a paratympanic organ in the bat Pipistrellus pipistrellus that was of variable occurrence and rudimentary in conformation compared with the paratympanic organ in birds.
Other species that we captured were: Lasiurus seminolus, the seminole bat (n = 11,27% of captures); Myotis austroriparius, the southeastern myotis, (n = 8, 20%); Pipistrellus subflavus, the eastern pipistrelle, (n = 3, 7%); Lasiurus borealis, the red bat, (n = 3, 7%).
Local patterns of distribution and resource utilization of four bat species (Myotis brandti, Eptesicus nilssoni, Plecotus auritus, and Pipistrellus pipistrellus) in patchy and continuous environments.
the body weight of the Japanese pipistrelle, Pipistrellus abramus, increases by up to 30.
Streit and Nagel (1993) reported, in adults of the insectivorous bat Pipistrellus pipistrellus, levels of Pb in the liver between 2.
We observed a strong association of several viral lineages to particular bat genera for paramyxoviruses identified in Hipposideros, Miniopterus, Coleura, Myotis, and Pipistrellus bats, although the bats were sampled from geographically distant locations.
The effects of illuminating the roost entrance on the emergence behaviour of Pipistrellus pygmaeus.
Nomenclature follows Wilson and Reeder (2005) for scientific and vernacular names except for Parastrellus and Perimyotis, which we used instead of Pipistrellus (following Hoofer et al.