Piroplasmosis


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Related to Piroplasmosis: anaplasmosis

Piroplasmosis

 

a transmissible disease of horses, cattle, pigs, and dogs. Piroplasmosis is characterized by elevated body temperature, anemia, jaundice, and hemoglobinuria. The causative agents are Piroplasma, which parasitize and destroy the red blood cells of animals. The carriers of Piroplasma are ixodine ticks. Animals afflicted with the disease acquire infection immunity and remain parasite carriers for four months to two or three years. Diagnosis is made from clinical symptoms, epizootic data, and the results of laboratory tests. Chemotherapeutic preparations (Trypan Blue, Trypaflavine, Acaprin, berenil) are used in treatment. For a discussion of preventive measures see.

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References in periodicals archive ?
The World Organisation for Animal Health has listed the United States as free of equine piroplasmosis since 1978, although recent cases have occurred.
On October 2, 2009, a mare in Kleberg County, Texas, USA, showed clinical signs of equine piroplasmosis.
cajennense ticks includes southeast Texas; they are not known to be present in other parts of the United States where cases of equine piroplasmosis have occurred (11).
Piroplasmosis, also known as equine babesiosis, is not found in the United States.
Horses that enter the country for sale or competition must be declared free of piroplasmosis.
ARS and WSU have applied for patents on the piroplasmosis tests.