Cymbeline

(redirected from Pisanio)
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Cymbeline

(sĭm`bəlēn) or

Cunobelinus

(kyo͞o'nōbĭlī`nəs), d. c.A.D. 40, British king. His conquest of the Trinovantes (of Essex) reportedly made him the wealthiest and most powerful ruler in SE England. After his death his kingdom was divided between his sons Togodumnus and CaractacusCaractacus
or Caradoc
, fl. A.D. 50, British king; son of Cymbeline. After the Roman invasion of A.D. 43, he led British resistance until defeated in A.D. 50. He was captured and taken to Rome. Emperor Claudius, admiring his courage, spared his life.
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. Cymbeline gives his name, but little else, to Shakespeare's Cymbeline.
References in periodicals archive ?
Gina Bloom, referring to a passage from Cymbeline in which Pisanio observes that "[s]lander's breath / Rides on the posting winds" (3.
Anthony Heald is solid as the physician Cornelius, and Tony DeBruno as Posthumus' servant Pisanio is a linchpin around which the story revolves.
Frustrated by the cautious pace recommended to her by her servant Pisanio, she recalls the hourglass, an earlier mode of marking time:
When Pisanio duly escorts her to Milford Haven, only to report Posthumus's command that she be killed, Imogen erupts:
When Imogen comes upon him she misreads the forms of his body for those of her beloved Posthumus: "this is his hand," she says (309), and there is a sly echo here of what Cloten said earlier when he wrested from Pisanio the letter directing Imogen to Milford Haven: "It is Posthumus's hand" (3.
There's plucky Imogen, excellently played by the diminutive Hayley Carmichael, her beloved Posthumus (played by the writer) and Imogen's maid, Pisanio, in the form of the very tall and lean Kirsty Woodward.
In fact, Pisanio believes he is giving Imogen a precious medicine not a sleeping potion, and it was Cornelius who earlier, unbeknownst to either Pisanio or the Queen, substituted the sleeping potion for the poison the Queen had requested.
Fisher, as Cloten; Holly Frey, as Lady Helen/First Lord; Kyle Long, as Philario/Caius Lucius/Guiderius; David Stuart Bull, as Iachimo; and Stuart Phillips, as Pisanio.
Certainly Pericles, Cymbeline, and The Winter's Tale show central characters rescued from tyrants or their own tyranny, and innocents resurrected from death, by an intervening deity (Diana, Jupiter, Apollo) as well as by wise counsel or medical-magical ministry (Helicanus and Cerimon in Pericles; Belarius, Pisanio, and Cornelius in Cymbeline; Camillo and Paulina in The Winter's Tale) and by the talismanic power of a chaste maid (Marina, Innogen, Perdita).
He works on Posthumus through the ear: When Pisanio first reads of Posthumus's suspicions against Imogen, he exclaims, "O master, what a strange infection / Is fall'n into thy ear