pistil

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pistil

(pĭs`tĭl), one of the four basic parts of a flowerflower,
name for the specialized part of a plant containing the reproductive organs, applied to angiosperms only. A flower may be thought of as a modified, short, compact branch bearing lateral appendages.
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, the central structure around which are arranged the stamens, the petals, and the sepals. The pistil is usually called the female reproductive organ of a flowering plant, although the actual reproductive structures are microscopic. The pistil has a bulbous base (the ovary) containing the ovules, which develop into seeds after fertilization of egg cell(s) in the ovule. A pistil is composed of one or more highly modified leaves (carpels), each containing one or more ovules. A flower may have one or more simple pistils, each a separate organ, or, in higher orders, a compound pistil, formed of several fused carpels. Usually, there is above the ovary a stalk (the style) bearing on its tip the stigma, where the pollen grains land and germinate (see pollinationpollination,
transfer of pollen from the male reproductive organ (stamen or staminate cone) to the female reproductive organ (pistil or pistillate cone) of the same or of another flower or cone.
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). The stigma is often sticky or hairy, to retain the pollen. Evolutionary relationships can often be inferred from the location of the ovary in relation to the other parts of the flower. If the stamens, petals, and sepals are attached beneath the ovary, the flower is hypogynous and the ovary is superior; if they are attached above, the ovary is inferior and the flower epigynous; if the ovary is located in a receptacle at the outer edges of which are attached the other flower parts, it is called superior or half-inferior and the flower perigynous. A flower that has one or more pistils but no stamens (or nonfunctional ones) is called pistillate, or female, as distinguished from a staminate, or male, flower, in which the pistil is nonfunctional or absent.

Pistil

 

the reproductive organ of a flower. The pistil, which is located in the center of the flower, typically consists of a hollow and enlarged inferior part—the ovary, a slender and usually cylindrical style or a stylodium, and a stigma. The stigma usually crowns the style or stylodia. If the stylodia are reduced, the stigma sits directly on the ovary. The ovary contains ovules, from which seeds develop after fertilization. The pericarp develops from the walls of the ovary. Thus, the pistil as a whole participates in formation of the fruit. Many botanists consider the term “pistil” to be superfluous because it is synonymous with the apocarpous gynoecium (a simple pistil formed from a single carpel or several free carpels) or with the cenocarpous gynoecium (a compound pistil formed from two or more united carpels).

pistil

[′pist·əl]
(botany)
The ovule-bearing organ of angiosperms; consists of an ovary, a style, and a stigma.

pistil

the female reproductive part of a flower, consisting of one or more separate or fused carpels; gynoecium
References in periodicals archive ?
The number of stamens determines the class of the flower and the number of pistils determines its order.
At the base of the pistil is the ovary that develops into fruit containing seeds.
Because the developmental stage of pistils and pollen is critical, pollen tube emergence is usually seen in about 60-70% of the pistil/ ovule units that were placed on the plates.
Peacock sees sexuality in every stamen, pistil and petal, and speculates on the possible links between the flower depicted and Mary Delaney's sex life.
Pollen grain germination with pollen tube emission on the stigma and pollen tube growth in the style of flower buds were observed in all analyzed pistils analyzed (Fig.
Complete flowers are composed of stamens, pistils, petals, and sepals.
Flowers vary widely in their forms and colors, but there are four basic floral organs that they have in common: sepals, petals, stamens, and pistils (Fig.
Where, for example, in the medieval world plants had been identified by their medicinal properties, now they were grouped according to their number of pistils and stamens--the means by which plants are pollinated.
It gets its name from its habitat, the Cape of Good Hope in South Africa, and from its blooms, which have the swoop and extruding pistils of honeysuckle flowers.
Gently cut out courgette flowers, remove the pistils and fill with a table spoon of the custard.
When preparing fresh flowers for eating, it is necessary to remove pistils and stamens (these will make the flowers taste bitter).