piston

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piston

a disc or cylindrical part that slides to and fro in a hollow cylinder. In an internal-combustion engine it is forced to move by the expanding gases in the cylinder head and is attached by a pivoted connecting rod to a crankshaft or flywheel, thus converting reciprocating motion into rotation

Piston

 

the moving component of a reciprocating engine that is fitted to the internal surface of a cylinder and moves back and forth along the direction of the cylinder’s axis. In engines, power cylinders, and presses, the piston transmits the pressure of a working fluid—gas, vapor, or liquid—to the moving parts. In some types of engines, such as two-cycle internal-combustion engines, the piston also plays a role in the gas distribution process. In pumps and compressors, the suction, compression, and delivery of the liquid or gas are accomplished by the reciprocating piston.

A piston may be of the trunk, disk, or plunger type, depending on the piston’s length-to-diameter ratio and on the piston’s design. The trunk piston, whose length is somewhat greater than its diameter, has a head, grooves for piston rings, and a guide skirt. The height of a disk piston is determined only by the size of the sealing device; the rod on which the piston is mounted serves to align the piston. The plunger piston, whether a plunger, ram, or pin, usually operates with a smooth surface; its length is several times greater than its diameter.

In rotary-piston internal-combustion engines, a rotor performs the functions of a piston in transmitting the pressure of a working fluid to the moving parts.

piston

[′pis·tən]
(electromagnetism)
A sliding metal cylinder used in waveguides and cavities for tuning purposes or for reflecting essentially all of the incident energy. Also known as plunger; waveguide plunger.
(engineering)
(mechanical engineering)
A sliding metal cylinder that reciprocates in a tubular housing, either moving against or moved by fluid pressure.

piston

piston
A sliding plug in an actuating cylinder that converts pressure into force and then into work. In reciprocating engines, a piston compresses the fuel-air mixture and transmits force from expanding gases in the cylinder to the crankshaft.
References in periodicals archive ?
Spring piston airguns have no valves or other complex parts to do their jobs--just a piston that compresses a small amount of air.
Charaterization of MoN coatings for coatings for pistons in a diesel engine", Materials and Design, 31: 624-627.
The piston was found to have a large part of its skirt missing, plus a broken oil control ring and cracks near the piston pin area.
The shown solution for reduction of the friction force between pistons and cylindrical bores increases contact area that also means an alignment of the piston and the bore.
Multiple pistons must be accurately positioned and synchronised in the absence of the crankshaft, otherwise the compression rate and ratio will vary leading to combustion variations and potential misfires.
Nordson EFD s new piston is made from a pliable material that allows the inserted piston to flex under pressure, creating a tight seal between the piston and barrel.
Aluminum piston is expanded more than other kinds because of heat increase and it may remove piston clearance.
In his new role, Chapman will be responsible for creating Pistons content for the radio station and team to be used on the station's various digital platforms.
After putting front and center Stan Van Gundy as the new team president and head coach of the 2004 world champions Pistons, the Pistons solidified their front office by hiring former New Orleans Hornets/Pelicans General Manager Jeff Bower who held the position from 2009 until 2010.
Make a habit of wiping down all aircraft pistons with a clean dry cloth before and after each flight and after you wash the aircraft.
At the same time, the power output per litre of engine displacement is increasing as engines are downsized and boosted by turbo- or super-charging, subjecting pistons to higher mechanical and thermal loads.
AIP is working as a leader for the manufacture of Pistons and Rings for automobiles (mainly two / three wheelers), chain saws, brush cutters, agriculture sprayers and compressors.