pitcher plant

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pitcher plant,

any of several insectivorous plants with leaves adapted for trapping insects. Each leaf forms a "pitcher," a somewhat trumpet-shaped enclosure, usually containing a liquid. An insect that enters, lured by nectar and sometimes by brilliant coloration, is prevented from retreating by deflexed bristles and ultimately is drowned in the fluid. The trapped insects are apparently digested by plant enzymes and perhaps by bacteria present in the collected rainwater solution. There are three families of pitcher plants. The American family (the Sarraceniaceae) comprises three genera of bog plants, Sarracenia of E North America, Darlingtonia of N California and adjacent Oregon (the single species is D. californica), and Heliamphora of N South America. The common pitcher plant, or side-saddle flower (S. purpurea), is found in bogs from Labrador to Florida and Iowa. The Nepenthaceae, an Old World tropical family, ranging from China to Australia and Pacifica and found chiefly in Borneo, consists of the single genus Nepenthes. Many of its species and hybrids, sometimes also called monkey cups, are cultivated as novelties for their large and showy pendent pitchers. The largest pitchers are found in Nepenthes species, some of which are apparently modified to attract small mammals to feed on their nectar so that the pitchers can catch the animals' feces. The Australian pitcher plant (Cephalotus follicularis) is the single species of the family Cephalotaceae. The bottom leaves of its low rosette are modified into brightly colored, slipper-shaped receptacles with lids and teeth. Other insectivorous plants include the bladderwortbladderwort
, any plant of the genus Utricularia, insectivorous or carnivorous aquatic plants, many native to North America. Small animals are caught and digested in bladderlike organs of the finely divided submerged leaves.
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, butterwort, Venus's-flytrapVenus's-flytrap,
insectivorous or carnivorous bog plant (Dionaea muscipula) native to the Carolina savannas and now widely cultivated as a novelty. The leaves, borne in a low rosette, resemble bear traps.
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, and sundew.

pitcher plant

[′pich·ər ‚plant]
(botany)
Any of various insectivorous plants of the families Sarraceniaceae and Nepenthaceae; the leaves form deep pitchers in which water collects and insects are drowned and digested.

pitcher plant

any of various insectivorous plants of the genera Sarracenia, Darlingtonia, Nepenthes, and Cephalotus, having leaves modified to form pitcher-like organs that attract and trap insects, which are then digested
References in periodicals archive ?
Nutrient uptake from captured prey can increase plant growth rates in Sarracenia pitcher plants (Gibson, 1983), as it does in other carnivorous plants (Juniper et al.
Larvae of Sarcophagidae (Insecta: Diplera) and their relationship with the pitcher plants (Sarraceniaceae: Sanacenia) of Southeastern U.
The purple pitcher plant, Sarracenia purpurea , is a northern species but quite different: The pitchers are low, squat and clustered.
It is said that Pitcher plants have a tremendous will to survive and propagate.
Sundews and butterworts have what's known as flypaper/adhesive traps, while pitcher plants use pitfalls, and bladderworts, as their name suggests, use water-filled bladder traps.
Trap surfaces that work only when wet also evolved in North American and Australian pitcher plants.
Stingless bees produced delicate funnel nests on the sides of tree trunks; a mantis resembling a shrivelled leaf sat in ambush in the leaf litter; a baby python lay knotted on a twig; and in the heath forest, a spectacular red-and-blue orb-web spider was regularly found around the pitcher plants.
He is accused of importing two endangered species - two canebrake pitcher plants and one green pitcher plant - without the correct permits.
Other hardy sarracenias include Sarracenia flava, the elegant yellow pitcher plant, and Sarracenia leucophylla, the white trumpet, which has exquisite white markings at the top of the pitcher.
He thinks pitcher plants and Venus flytraps are just gorgeous.
The film in the pitcher plant is water-based, and is slippery enough to repel the oils on the feet of insects, causing them to slide into the digestive system of the plant.
There are numerous variations on this life-cycle pattern, with desert frogs breeding in flooded areas after heavy rains, tadpoles being defended from predators by the mother, use of tree holes and bromeliads as breeding sites in forest habitats, and even breeding in the pitchers of pitcher plants.