pitcher plant

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pitcher plant,

any of several insectivorous plants with leaves adapted for trapping insects. Each leaf forms a "pitcher," a somewhat trumpet-shaped enclosure, usually containing a liquid. An insect that enters, lured by nectar and sometimes by brilliant coloration, is prevented from retreating by deflexed bristles and ultimately is drowned in the fluid. The trapped insects are apparently digested by plant enzymes and perhaps by bacteria present in the collected rainwater solution. There are three families of pitcher plants. The American family (the Sarraceniaceae) comprises three genera of bog plants, Sarracenia of E North America, Darlingtonia of N California and adjacent Oregon (the single species is D. californica), and Heliamphora of N South America. The common pitcher plant, or side-saddle flower (S. purpurea), is found in bogs from Labrador to Florida and Iowa. The Nepenthaceae, an Old World tropical family, ranging from China to Australia and Pacifica and found chiefly in Borneo, consists of the single genus Nepenthes. Many of its species and hybrids, sometimes also called monkey cups, are cultivated as novelties for their large and showy pendent pitchers. The largest pitchers are found in Nepenthes species, some of which are apparently modified to attract small mammals to feed on their nectar so that the pitchers can catch the animals' feces. The Australian pitcher plant (Cephalotus follicularis) is the single species of the family Cephalotaceae. The bottom leaves of its low rosette are modified into brightly colored, slipper-shaped receptacles with lids and teeth. Other insectivorous plants include the bladderwortbladderwort
, any plant of the genus Utricularia, insectivorous or carnivorous aquatic plants, many native to North America. Small animals are caught and digested in bladderlike organs of the finely divided submerged leaves.
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, butterwort, Venus's-flytrapVenus's-flytrap,
insectivorous or carnivorous bog plant (Dionaea muscipula) native to the Carolina savannas and now widely cultivated as a novelty. The leaves, borne in a low rosette, resemble bear traps.
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, and sundew.

pitcher plant

[′pich·ər ‚plant]
(botany)
Any of various insectivorous plants of the families Sarraceniaceae and Nepenthaceae; the leaves form deep pitchers in which water collects and insects are drowned and digested.

pitcher plant

any of various insectivorous plants of the genera Sarracenia, Darlingtonia, Nepenthes, and Cephalotus, having leaves modified to form pitcher-like organs that attract and trap insects, which are then digested
References in periodicals archive ?
Reverse latitudinal trends in species richness of pitcher-plant food webs.
Pitcher-Plant Midges and Mosquitos--a Processing Chain Commensalism.
Collections were made in the spring of 1993 before adult emergence so that 100% of the genotypes were still available for sampling as larvae in the pitcher-plant leaves.
To simulate the timing of prey capture by pitcher-plant leaves in the field (Bradshaw and Holzapfel 1983), experimental cohorts were fed 29 flies on the day of hatch, and 108, 56, and 29 flies at successive weekly intervals for a total of 7.
The genetic basis of photoperiodism and its evolutionary divergence among populations of the pitcher-plant mosquito, Wyeomyia smithii.
Correlational selection on life history traits in the pitcher-plant mosquito.
Habitat selection by the pitcher-plant mosquito, Wyeomyia smithii: behavioral and genetic aspects.
2] within open-canopy pitcher-plant bogs, and when corrected for the 75% burrow occupancy crayfish averaged 2.
1993), but with the pitcher-plant mosquito, Wyeomyia smithii (Coq.
We used this approach to evaluate developmental flexibility and developmental determinism in the pitcher-plant mosquito, Wyeomyia smithii.
Because the availability of resources derived from prey capture can potentially control aspects of plant performance, inquiline performance and inquiline community structure, I sought to document the quantity and schedule of prey capture by pitcher-plant leaves.