Piteälven

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Piteälven

 

a river in northern Sweden. The Piteälven is about 370 km long and drains an area of 11,200 sq km. It rises in the Scandinavian Mountains, near the Norwegian border, flowing out of Lake Peskehaure. It follows a course with many rapids, forming a series of waterfalls, including the Trollforsen, Storforsen, and Fällforsen, before emptying into the Gulf of Bothnia of the Baltic Sea. The mean flow rate is 170 cu m per sec. High water is in May and June. The Piteälven is frozen from December through April. It is used for floating timber. There is a hydroelectric power plant on the river. The seaport of Piteâ is situated near its mouth.

References in periodicals archive ?
The studied landscape extends from the northern side of the Pite River toward the northeast and encompasses a variety of topographical features, including the granitoid massif of Gajsajs (1046 m) in the west and the western slopes of the Arvesduoddar Mountains in the east.
Between 1700 and 1800, the study region encompassed several taxation lands, of which Madme, Arvas, and Siebmer, situated on the north side of the Pite River, are considered in most detail here (Fig.
The taxation land was larger at that time, also encompassing forest land on the south side of the Pite River, which accords with previous studies showing that there were fewer (and thus larger) taxation lands during the 17th century (Hultblad, 1968:89-90; Skold, 1992:130-131).
In the mid-19th century, one of Henrik Anderson's descendents acquired property rights to a smaller part of the taxation land, named Ahkabaktte, and an additional piece of land farther up the Pite River (Fig.
2], but unlike the other two taxation lands, it did not border the Pite River.
Within a Sami village community, there were also areas for common use, and in this study region, one such area was positioned along the southern part of the Pite River on the south side (Fig.
The people inhabiting Arvas had no access to the Pite River, which was important for fishing.
Throughout the Pite River valley, as well as in the regions north and south of this area, many taxation lands were either deserted or transformed into agricultural properties (like Madme) during the late 20th century.
The center will provide an understanding of the ecosystems, culture and history as well as information about tourist attractions and facilities that are located in the 248-mile Pite River Valley.