Piankhi

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Piankhi

(pēäng`kē, –ăng`–), king of ancient NubiaNubia
, ancient state of NE Africa. At the height of its political power Nubia extended, from north to south, from the First Cataract of the Nile (near Aswan, Egypt) to Khartoum, in Sudan. It early came under the influence of the pharaohs, and in the 20th cent. B.C.
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 (c.741–c.715 B.C.). After subduing Upper Egypt, he defeated (c.721 B.C.) Tefnakhte, lord of Saïs, who had just completed the conquest of Lower Egypt. Piankhi was also victorious at Memphis. He returned (c.718 B.C.) to his Nubian capital, Napata, and erected a granite stele on which he inscribed an account of his campaigns. Piankhi's rule in Egypt was too brief to achieve much; immediately after his withdrawal Tefnakhte reestablished his rule of Lower Egypt.
References in periodicals archive ?
294) lists Piye, Shabaka, Sargon II, Sennacherib, and later rulers.
18) It is Pankhy, Piankhy, Piankhi, "The living," also known as Piyi, Piye, the founder of the XXV Ethiopian dynasty (747-656 BCE, at least two centuries before the birth of Plato, the Greek philosopher of Athens).
Shuchang H, Qiao N, Piye N, Mingwei H, Xiaoshu S, Feng S, Sheng W, Opler M.
He believed that Nubia's leaders, including Piye, were light-skinned Egypto-Libyans who ruled over the primitive Africans.
These include western Keo piye, eastern Keo pile (Tule 1998), Ngadha and Lio pire, Manggarai pireng and ireng, Sikka pireng, Nita piret, and Tana 'Ai piren.
Angguye and Hilyaqalyconya, one of the deceased's disgruntled maternal relatives, persuaded a number of young men and older adolescents to perform two soul-capture rites, mekikice (literally, 'rattling noise', held at night) and aa'ma piye hiuwye (literally, 'dead person custom, behaviour', performed in daylight).
Piye can be glossed as 'dead' and 'death' but its primary significance is the sensory aspect of a dead body, namely stench.
Moreover, the following wording is used by Asoka at the beginning and only at the beginning of all seven Pillar Edicts and five of the fourteen Rock Edicts (III, V, VI, IX, XI; Jaugada I, II [devanam piye hevam aha]): devanam piye piyadasi laja hevam aha, which is supposed to echo: [theta]atiy Darayavaus xsaya[theta]iya.
The 25th dynasty King Piye built a pyramid at El-Kurru in 750 BC, and King Taharqa built his pyramid at Nuri in 690 BC.
Thus, on the great stela of Piye, we have the two kings Osorkon IV and Iuput II both entitled nsw, here in each case only sensibly translatable as "king," as they were mere Delta kinglets.
The arrivals of Cambyses, Alexander, and Octavius - and Sheshonq and Piye before them - are not barriers, merely points of transition, and the evidence of each new phase can surely illuminate its predecessors in Egypt's long history.