planing hull

planing hull

[′plān·iŋ ‚həl]
(naval architecture)
A hull form with straight buttock lines, designed to develop positive hydrodynamic pressures on its bottom so that its draft decreases with increasing speed, enabling it to rise higher on the wave that it is generating.
References in periodicals archive ?
Len Imas of the Department of Civil, Environmental and Ocean Engineering at Stevens Institute of Technology has been awarded a grant from the Office of Naval Research (ONR) for the investigation of ultra-deep vee planing hull hydrodynamics.
Once a vessel with a planing hull achieves enough speed, the water pushes against it with a high enough pressure resulting in a force known as hydrodynamic lift.
The Xtreme is a true planing hull so it rides higher in the water than traditional tubes and actually displaces about the same as three 24-inchers for similar buoyancy.
The new Cat engines include the C32, currently the largest Caterpillar planing hull marine propulsion engine, along with the C7, the smallest in the C family range to date.
The deep vee planing hull form is powered by twin 400 hp marine diesel engines to attain an operational speed of 25 knots and top speed of 30 knots.
Peter Duclos, president of Gladding-Hearn said: We selected the Volvo Penta IPS2 for our next-generation Chesapeake-class boats to improve the performance and the arrangement of planing hulls like our pilot boats.