Pleasence


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Pleasence

Donald. 1919--95, British actor. His films include Dr Crippen (1962) and Cul de Sac (1966)
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Kurt Russell does a good job as the Clint Eastwoodstyle hero, and there are plenty of memorable set pieces, as well as a string of famous faces including Lee Van Cleef, Ernest Borgnine and Donald Pleasence.
Pleasence had been a prisoner in Stalag Luft I after his bomber was shot down and gave input on sets.
Donald Pleasence (1919-1995) acted on the London stage in 1939, joined the RAF as a wireless operator, was shot down in a 166 Squadron Lancaster.
Donald Pleasence played a US president held hostage; Russell was a one-eyed mercenary called Snake forced to rescue him and Adrienne Barbeau co-starred as a tough cookie.
Problems in this cluster tend to last for longer than other problem types before being resolved (Genn 1999: 63; Pleasence et al.
With: Sacha Tarter, Trevor Sather, Susannah York, Sian Phillips, Angela Pleasence, Anna Massey, Ben Willbound, Basil Moss, Anna Hourmouzios.
But many years later he would offer something even more bizarre in his own film, Fantastic Voyage (1966), in which Raquel Welch is shrunk to the size of a pinhead, so that she, and her diving suit, can join mad-eyed Donald Pleasence in a submarine journey though the veins of a dying scientist in need of brain surgery.
Although not a fan of football, I have to admit it was exciting when Donald Pleasence saved Beckham's penalty, thoughtful of Heskey to give us the chance to see how brilliant Zidane can be with a free kick, and inspirational of Gerrard and James to combine to lay on a demonstration of how Beckham should have taken the penalty.
To put things in perspective, that's a whole lot smaller than Donald Pleasence and Raquel Welch were in "Fantastic Voyage" in 1966.
The original 1978 cult horror classic directed by John Carpenter and produced by Moustapha Akkad, starred the then young ingE[umlaut]nue Jamie Lee Curtis, along with Donald Pleasence, Nancy Kyes, P.
BLACK ARROW THE brooding presence of Oliver Reed as the wicked Sir Daniel, coupled with Donald Pleasence as the murderous priest Sir Oliver, gives this 1985 made-for-TV movie more dramatic power than you might expect from a story written to order for a children's magazine.