Podolia

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Podolia

(pōdō`lyə), region, SW Ukraine, separated in the south from Moldova by the Dniester and in the west from W Galicia by the Southern Buh. It borders on Volhynia in the north. Kamyanets-PodilskyyKamyanets-Podilskyy
, Rus. Kamenets-Podolski, city (1989 pop. 102,000), Khmelnytskyy region, Ukraine. It is a rail terminus and has industries that produce foodstuffs, tobacco, machinery, machine tools, and automobile parts.
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 (its historic capital), Mohyliv-PodilskyyMohyliv-Podilskyy
, Rus. Mogilev-Podolski, city, E Ukraine, at the confluence of the Dniester and Derlo rivers. In the 17th cent. it became an important commercial point on the road from Ukraine to Turkey and was periodically ruled by the Ukrainian Cossacks, Poles, and
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, VinnytsyaVinnytsya
, Rus. Vinnitsa, city (1989 pop. 374,000), capital of Vinnytsya region, in Podolia, Ukraine, on the Southern Buh River. A railroad junction in a sugar beet district, the city has food-processing industries. It was taken by Russia from Poland in 1793.
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, and KhmelnytskyyKhmelnytskyy
, Rus. Khmelmitsky, formerly Proskurov
, city (1989 pop. 237,000), capital of Khmelnytskyy region, Ukraine, on the Southern Buh River. It is a rail terminus and highway hub and has food-processing (notably sugar-refining) plants and factories that
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 are the chief cities. The population is predominantly Ukrainian; the large Jewish minority that settled in Podolia in the Middle Ages was virtually exterminated by German occupation forces in World War II. A fertile hilly plain drained by the Dniester and the Southern Buh, Podolia is one of the richest and most densely populated agricultural regions of Ukraine. The principal crops are sugar beets, wheat, tobacco, and sunflowers. Dairy farming and beekeeping are also important, and phosphate is mined. Food processing, especially sugar milling, is the major industry. One of Ukraine's oldest regions, Podolia was part of Kievan Rus from the 10th cent. and later belonged to the Halych and Volhynia principalities. In the 14th cent. Polish colonists began to convert the region of Podolia from steppe into arable farmland. W Podolia was annexed to Poland in 1430; the eastern section was part of Lithuania until the latter's union with Poland in 1569. Occupied by Turkey in 1672, Podolia was returned to Poland by the Treaty of Karlowitz in 1699. E Podolia passed to Russia in 1793. The western portion was transferred to Austria in 1772, belonged to Poland from 1918 to 1939, and was then annexed by the USSR in 1945.
References in periodicals archive ?
Ihor Podolian said it during a briefing held in Kyiv on November 07.
She was captured while out on a shopping trip by Jews from her Podolian hometown, who locked her up and pressured her to relapse back to Judaism.
Multitalia) in feeding for Podolian young bulls and influence on productive performances and meat quality traits.
The stories and essays about Jewish families who returned to their shtetls in the Podolian part of Ukraine and continued to preserve the pre-Holocaust way of life have widely contributed to the rediscovery of the traditional Jewish world.
There, these signs of metropolitan distinction seem incongruous, Paris and Jerusalem plunked down in the middle of a Podolian village.
Commanding Officer of the 12th Polish Podolian Lancers, who fought with Ihe 7th Queen's Own Hussars in Italy under the command of Col.
These people are probably from the Podolian town of Kamianets-Podil's'kyi (Kumenets-Podolsk in Yiddish).
Essentially harmonizations of Podolian Polish and Ukrainian folk melodies from Woronince and the surrounding area (which Liszt heard and which Marie would also have known), these pieces were assumably composed during Liszt's second visit to Woronince late in 1847, when Carolyne invited a gypsy band to perform for Liszt's birthday on 22 October 1847.
the Kipchak Turkie texts in Armenian script from the Podolian Armenian colonies of Eastern Poland in the sixteenth and Seventeenth centuries.