polar

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Related to Polars: Polaris

polar

1. situated at or near, coming from, or relating to either of the earth's poles or the area inside the Arctic or Antarctic Circles
2. having or relating to a pole or poles
3. Chem
a. (of a molecule or compound) being or having a molecule in which there is an uneven distribution of electrons and thus a permanent dipole moment
b. (of a crystal or substance) being or having a crystal that is bound by ionic bonds

polar

(poh -ler) (polar system) See magnetic cataclysmic variables.

polar

[′pō·lər]
(astronomy)
A member of a class of cataclysmic variable stars whose light displays strong circular polarization. Also known as AM Herculis star.
(mathematics)
For a conic section, the polar of a point is the line that passes through the points of contact of the two tangents drawn to the conic from the point.
For a quadric surface, the polar of a point is the plane that passes through the curve which is the locus of the points of contact of the tangents drawn to the surface from the point.
For a quadric surface, the polar of a line is the line of intersection of the planes which are tangent to the surface at its points of intersection with the original line.

polar

i. An air mass with characteristics developed over high latitudes, especially within subpolar highs. Continental and maritime are two types of polar air masses. See polar air mass.
ii. The parameters plotted on polar coordinates. See polar coordinates.
References in classic literature ?
As on the land, so in the waters of the sea, a slow southern migration of a marine fauna, which during the Pliocene or even a somewhat earlier period, was nearly uniform along the continuous shores of the Polar Circle, will account, on the theory of modification, for many closely allied forms now living in areas completely sundered.
The killing of a polar bear is very dangerous, but thrice dangerous is it, and three times thrice, to kill a mother bear with her cubs.
He had traced through cold and heat, across the deeps of the oceans, with instruments of his own invention, over the inhospitable heart of the polar ice and the sterile visage of the deserts, league by league, patiently, unweariedly, remorselessly, from their ever-shifting cradle under the magnetic pole to their exalted death-bed in the utmost ether of the upper atmosphere each one of the Isoconical Tellurions Lavalle's Curves, as we call them today.
Nothing could be more weird than the appearance of these seemingly basaltic summits; they stood out in fantastic profile against the sombre sky, and the beholder might have fancied them to be the legendary ruins of some vast city of the middle ages, such as the icebergs of the polar seas sometimes mimic them in nights of gloom.
Mirth never reigned there; there was never even a little bear-ball, with the storm for music, while the polar bears went on their hindlegs and showed off their steps.