Polemoniaceae


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Polemoniaceae

[‚päl·ə‚mō·nē′ās·ē‚ē]
(botany)
A family of autotrophic dicotyledonous plants in the order Polemoniales distinguished by lack of internal phloem, corolla lobes that are convolute in the bud, three carpels, and axile placentation.
References in periodicals archive ?
Such cases were reported from Ericaceae (personal observation), Polemoniaceae (Grant & Grant, 1965; Mabberley, 2000), Gentianaceae (Thiv & Kadereit, 2002a), Rubiaceae (Robbrecht, 1988), Boraginaceae (Taroda & Gibbs, 1986), Convolvulaceae (Wagner, 1989; Deroin, 1996), and Solanaceae (Robyns, 1930; Hunziker, 2001).
Por otra parte, las familias Calyceraceae, Campanulaceae, Commelinaceae, Polemoniaceae, Hypericaceae y Urticaceae fueron las que estuvieron presentes en la isla Taquile, pero ausentes en el cerro Chiani, habiendo un mayor numero de familias ausentes en la isla.
glaberrima Tovar si Polypogon interruptus Kunth POLEMONIACEAE Cantua buxifolia Jussieu ex Lamarck Cantua candelilla Brand ccantu POLYGALACEAE Monnina salicifolia Ruiz & Pav.
National Gardens Scheme, gardens open at 28 Sunnyside Terrace, Trimdon Grange, Trimdon Station, Durham (including national collection of 125 types of plant in Polemoniaceae family in 3.
Yreka Phlox (Phlox hirsuta) A perennial shrub in the family Polemoniaceae, the Yreka phlox is endemic to Siskiyou County in northern California, where it grows at only two locations on serpentine slopes near the city of Yreka.
mellifera Shrub Loasaceae Mentzelia micrantha Annual Onagraceae Camissonia californica Annual Papaveraceae Romneya coulteri Suffrutescent(*) Polemoniaceae Allophyllum glutinosum Annual Scrophulariaceae Antirrhinum coulterianum Annual A.
Yreka Phlox (Phlox hirsuta) A perennial in the family Polemoniaceae, the Yreka phlox grows to about 6 inches (15 cm) from a stout, woody base.
Although not previously reported in the Polemoniaceae, the evolution of unilateral incompatibility between self-compatible pollen donors and self-incompatible pollen recipients has been described thoroughly in the Solanaceae (Grun 1961).
show how selfing has repeatedly evolved as a reproductive assurance mechanism in lineages of annual Polemoniaceae, while Schoen et al.