political action committee


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political action committee

(PAC), U.S. organization formed by a corporation, labor union, or association to raise money for political activity. Funds can be gathered by voluntary contributions from members, employees, or shareholders. Political action committees were first organized in the 1940s. The Political Action Committee organized by the Congress of Industrial Organizations (CIO) in 1943 was a model for later PACs. The election reform of 1974 limited individual campaign contributions and set guidelines for PACs; a Supreme Court ruling in 2010 ended restrictions on their funding. Many PACs represent special-interest groups, e.g., the National Rifle Association of America; others represent large conservative or liberal coalitions. Others are aligned with individual political campaigns, though their efforts cannot be coordinated with those of the candidate's campaign. Many PACs have directed their contributions toward congressional elections, in which they can contribute up to $5,000 to a candidate for each campaign (primary, runoff, and general election). Some, however, conduct independent negative campaigns against candidates they oppose, both in primary and general elections. Federal legislation enacted in 2002 barred attacks on candidates by name immediately before an election, but that rule was eased by a Supreme Court decision in 2007. Since the Court decision of 2010 that eased fund-raising restrictions on PACs, groups known as super PACs have arisen; these seek large, unlimited donations, often from a few wealthy contributors, and have tended to work for the election of a specific candidate.
References in periodicals archive ?
1, five new political action committees have registered with the Office of Campaign and Political Finance, four of which are independent expenditure committees, commonly known as super PACs.
In filing as a political action committee, Miller reversed his position from the first two hectic days of his Torrey-recruitment drive.
Fellow members then encouraged Denton to run for her district's spot on the state's political action committee.
And while farmers are an important political constituency, the lion's share of the bill's benefits didn't accrue to the small independent farmers who need it most--they went to the massive agribusiness farms that are, not coincidentally, among the most generous special interests when it comes to giving cash to candidates and their political action committees (PACs).
It describes itself as "a voluntary, employee-supported nonpartisan political action committee that supports local, state and national candidates who favor limited government, low taxes and a vibrant free enterprise system.
The Chamber has recently developed a Political Action Committee II(PAC II) and is in the process of developing a Federal Political Action Committee.
Last year, the political action committee of Northrup Grumman, which builds the B-2, donated $320,775 to members of Congress - almost doubling what it had spent in 1993 and 1994.
National Conservative Political Action Committee, which struck down Congress efforts to restrict campaign expenditures made by political-action committees like the NCPAC and the National Rifle Association.
IL -- IPC launched a website and recruitment campaign for its new political action committee to educate policy makers on issues that affect the electronics manufacturing industry.
The United Winchendon Political Action Committee announced that signatures are being collected to recall the two selectmen.
NAFCU's PAC, the National Association of Federal Credit Unions Political Action Committee, raised $2,801 last month, contributed $29,375 to federal candidates and committees and had $238,962 in its account at month's end.
The AICPA's Political Action Committee, and other professional PACs, supported Conaway in his hard-fought path to win a seat in Congress.