political prisoner

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political prisoner

someone imprisoned for holding, expressing, or acting in accord with particular political beliefs
References in periodicals archive ?
North Korea "continues to deny the very existence of these political prisons," the report says.
Kirby said the team's findings, based on testimony from hundreds of victims, defectors and witnesses, were unequivocal, and demanded closure of political prison camps believed to hold up to 120,000 people.
In North Korea, thousands of people were held in political prison camps despite not having committed any crime, and were subjected to harsh conditions.
Shin Dong-hyuk: I was born in a political prison camp in North Korea.
In her statement, Pillay said at least 200,000 people were believed to be interned in North Korea's 'elaborate network' of political prison camps, and that survivors of the camps whom she had spoken to 'described a system that represented the very antithesis of international human rights norms'.
In response, North Korea insists that the political prison camps do not exist and that "there can be no human rights problem in their people centered socialism.
And I just raced through the new Escape from Camp 14, the story of the only person born in one of North Koreas political prison camps who is known to have escaped.
Mian Iftikhar maintained that he loved literature very much adding that when he was in jail as political prison, he wrote two afsanas namely "Pansy" and "Sur Saikal" which depicted his love for literature.
Mapanje recalls his time in prison, where he struggled to maintain his sanity and some semblance of freedom amid the oppression and constriction of political prison life.
An estimated 150,000 to 200,000 persons are held in political prison camps in remote areas of the country; many of these prisoners were not duly convicted of a criminal offense.
Haifa Zangana spent her younger years in a political prison in Iraq.
As we will see, political prisoner/writers might most clearly be distinguished from common criminals who become writers, not in the value or even comprehensiveness of their texts, but in the political prison writer's presumption of a testamentary value, and the self-consciousness of that value, in his/her writing.