activism

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activism

active involvement as a member of a POLITICAL PARTY, PRESSURE GROUP, or related political organization, e.g. a ‘trades union activist’. Theories and research concerned with political activism suggest that the tendency is for activists generally to be of higher social status, more socially confident and often better informed than most nonactivists. Levels of political activism also vary according to political circumstances. For example, in times of political crisis many people may be drawn into politics who would not normally be politically active. Some theorists, especially in POLITICAL SCIENCE (e.g. LIPSET, 1959), have suggested that in Western societies, in such circumstances, high levels of political activity and less informed participants may pose a threat to the 'S tability of democracy’. More generally, however, increased participation in politics by members of lower status minority groups (e.g. new URBAN SOCIAL MOVEMENTS) is regarded as a favourable development. See also POLITICAL PARTICIPATION, OPINION LEADERS, TWOSTEP FLOW IN MASS COMMUNICATIONS, STABLE DEMOCRACY, SOCIAL MOVEMENTS.
References in periodicals archive ?
It would also help if he realised that his long political career has not endowed him with the credentials or the credibility of being seen as some kind of a political reformer.
He is also the grandson of Hassan al-Banna who was an Egyptian social and political reformer, best known for founding the Muslim Brotherhood, one of the largest and most influential 20th century Muslim revivalist organizations.
Herath, an author, poet, dramatist, and political reformer from Sri Lanka, offers a detailed account of the entire process and assesses the strengths, weaknesses, and implications of the new electoral system.
These include the papal "honeymoon" when Pins IX temporarily impressed Britain's political leaders not as a symbol of reaction, but as a theological and political reformer who, as ruler of the Papal States, might help transform not only his own small realm, but also the entire Italian peninsula into a modern constitutional state.
In his 1829 Advice to Young Men, the radical journalist and political reformer William Cobbett wrote: "Resolve to free yourselves from the slavery of the tea and coffee and other slop-kettle.
The poet WH Auden is honoured at Harborne Swimming Baths in Lordswood and at Crescent Tower in Brindley Walk there is a plaque to mark the work of political reformer Thomas Attwood.
Also On This Day: 1651: Charles II, defeated byCromwell at Worcester, fled to France; 1727: Birth of political reformer John Wilkes; 1860: The first professional golf championship took place at Prestwick in Scotland; 1918: Birth of American actress Rita Hayworth; 1956: Britain's first nuclear station, Calder Hall, opened; 2000: The Queen and Duke of Edinburgh visited the Vatican to meet the Pope.
Also on this day: 1724: Highwayman Jack Sheppard hanged in front of 200,000 people at Tyburn; 1750: Westminster Bridge formally opened; 1811: Birth of political reformer John Bright; 1896: Birth of English fascist leader Sir Oswald Mosley; 1918: In Budapest, Hungary was proclaimed an independent republic; 1959: The Sound of Music performed for the first time on Broadway; 1960: Death of American film actor Clark Gable; 1965: USSR launched unmanned spacecraft Venus III that successfully landed on Venus.
Anniversaries: 1727: Birth of political reformer and journalist John Wilkes; 1815: Napoleon arrived on the island of St Helena after being exiled; 1860: The first professional golf championship was held at Prestwick, Scotland and won by Willie Park; 1902: The first Cadillac was made in Detroit; 1903: Birth of American novelist Nathaniel West; 1956: The Queen opened Calder Hall, Britain's first nuclear power station; 1968: American Bob Beamon shattered the world long-jump record by a staggering 21 inches clearing 29ft 2 inches; 1979: Death of American humorist S J Perelman.
Anniversaries: 1804: Birth of political reformer Richard Cobden; 1924: Death of Czech author Franz Kafka; 1937: The Duke of Windsor married Mrs Wallis Warfield Simpson; 1946: First bikini swimming costume, named after the Bikini Atoll where the first peacetime atomic bomb tests were held, unveiled in Paris; 1954: Eighteen-year-old Lester Piggott won his first Derby on American horse Never say Die with 33-1 odds; 1956: Third-class travel on British Rail came to an end; 1962: Britain's first legal casino opened at the Metropole, Brighton; 1972: The first woman rabbi, Sally Priesand, was ordained, Cincinatti, Ohio.
Obviously we are pleased at the choice because he's an economic and political reformer," Mr Blair said.
Anniversaries: 1956: Third-class travel on British Rail abolished; 1946: First bikini swimming costume, named after the Bikini Atoll where the first peacetime atomic bomb tests were held, unveiled in Paris; 1937: The Duke of Windsor married Mrs Wallis Wa rfield Simpson; 1804: Birth of political reformer Richard Cobden.