Polyaenus


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Polyaenus

(pŏl'ē-ē`nəs), fl. c.153, Macedonian Greek writer. His Stratagems, anecdotes on the ruses of war, takes much from various ancient sources now lost.
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According to the fanciful Macedonian general and author Polyaenus, Cambyses II used cats and other sacred animals in the frontline, an act that deterred Egyptians from fighting.
43) A century ago, a scholar attempted to restore the Life of Epaminondas by bringing together quotations (with analyses) using not only an array of passages from Plutarch (some not having directly to do with Epaminondas), but also passages from Cornelius Nepos, Xenophon, Diodorus Siculus, Cicero, Polyaenus, and others to fit the passages together.
It includes material from Herotodus, Thucydides, Xenophon, Diodorus Siculus and Polyaenus, and Arrian.
Plato and Aristotle and that whole crowd of sages, heading as they were in different directions, drew more from Socrates' ways than from his words; Metrodorus and Hermarchus and Polyaenus, all great men--it was not Epicurus's school that made them such, but his com-raderie [contubernium].
of the common good; in this," Polyaenus says, "are all things;
Polyaenus 4, 1 contains an account of Macedonian women dressing as bacchantes to fight with their outnumbered men.
Burstein reasserts Sauneron and Yoyotte's suggestion that Tanutamun returned to Memphis after his defeat by Ashurbanipal, noting that Polyaenus mentions a battle near Memphis, which cannot be identified with that between Tanutamun and Ashurbanipal in 664/663, since according to the Assyrian texts.
These are Philochorus's "propylaia of the polis" in FGrH 328 F105, implicitly above the Anakeion in Polyaenus Strat.
That material relating to Iphicrates was compiled at some stage is suggested by the extraordinarily large number of stratagems attributed to him by the military writer Polyaenus (3.
14) The Stratagems of Polyaenus -- a work obscure now, but evidently popular in Sidney's day -- does not appear in Sidney's list of 'essential reading', so we cannot tell whether his account of Aristomenes had any influence;(15) but Messenia and its hero figure in books which we know (from the letter to Denny) that Sidney did read: Plutarch,(16) Polybius,(17) and Diodorus Siculus.
rhetorician Polyaenus states that the tale of Odysseus framing Palamedes for treason was the version used by the all the dramatists (1.
The differences between the three accounts (and a fourth from Polyaenus 1.