Polydorus


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Polydorus,

in Greek legend: see HecubaHecuba
, in Greek mythology, chief wife of Priam, king of Troy. Hecuba bore to Priam 19 children, including Paris, Hector, Troilus, Cassandra, and others who were prominent in the Trojan War.
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Polydorus,

Greek sculptor: see LaocoönLaocoön
, in Greek mythology, priest of Apollo who warned the Trojans not to touch the wooden horse made by the Greeks during the Trojan War. While he and his two sons were sacrificing to Poseidon at the seashore, two serpents came from the water and crushed them.
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References in periodicals archive ?
The allusion to Polydorus immediately calls to mind "the wealth of kings," for the youngest son of Priam had sought sanctuary in Thrace with all the Trojan gold.
Like Dante's Pier delle Vigne and, explicitly, like Virgil's Polydorus, Idalogos makes his appearance within a speaking tree, but tells of his birth and youth among pipe-playing shepherds that recall the eclogues of those same poets.
His descent from the classical heroes is signalled first by the ippogrifo, who is clearly modelled on Pegasus, and then by Astolfo, Alcina's ex-lover, who has been transmogrified, like the Aeneid's Polydorus, into a myrtle bush (Aeneid III.
A more recent study, Albert Ascoli's Bitter Harmony, lists the literary antecedents of Ruggiero on Alcina's island as including Dante, Polydorus, Achilles, Perseus, Ganymede, Hector, Hercules, and Aeneas (150).
If Dante had been able to believe the Polydorus tale, he would not have hurt Pier delle Vigne.
The reincarnation of the Aeneid's Polydorus also appears, for example, in Boccaccio's Filocolo IV and V.
We should also look to the Herculean memory feats of Cephalus, Antiphon, and Polydorus in the Parmenides where the immensely complex account of the dialectical turnings between the one and the many (others) have been committed to memory without, at least in the case of Antiphon, sustaining their interest in the issues involved.
In his distaste for those plays that dramatize their whole narrative history instead of rendering it via messengers, he recommends the example of Euripides' Hecuba, in which the long sequence of earlier events is recounted by the spirit of the murdered Polydorus rather than being presented on stage from his childhood onwards.