quantitative trait locus

(redirected from Polygenic traits)

quantitative trait locus

[‚kwänt·ə‚tād·iv ¦trāt ′lō·kəs]
(genetics)
The location of a gene that affects a quantitative trait.
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References in periodicals archive ?
On this regard, Vidovic et al [9] concluded that bias caused by the sample size is due to the difficulty of differentiating the effects of each gene in the analysis of polygenic traits.
Genetic variability and heritability estimates of some polygenic traits in upland cotton.
On the bright side, with more data and retrospective analysis it should become increasingly possible to improve on our understanding of complex polygenic traits and environmental influences.
Polygenic traits and complex diseases of adulthood including hypertension, coronary heart disease, stroke, cancer, uni/bipolar depression, asthma, gout, peptic ulcer, and osteoporosis have indicated a positive association with in-breeding or cousin marriages.
Genetic control of some polygenic traits in vulgar species.
Information on the quantum of induced polygenic variability or micromutations and the genetic parameters for different polygenic traits in segregating generations of mutagenized populations gives an indication about the scope of improvement in these traits through selection (Sheeba et al.
It describes the foundational genetics and statistical theory for established and new methodologies, focusing on polygenic traits, through 22 chapters written by an international group of researchers in genetics, psychiatry, and psychology.
Taken together, these studies support the hypothesis that the formulation of dense genetic maps on the basis of single-nucleotide polymorphisms is an important approach to elucidating polygenic traits of drug response and, in combination with appropriate nongenetic factors, might help to define a warfarin dose-response phenotype.
Because the site of crossing-over is random, selection for polygenic traits will alter the number and position of crossovers found in the lines a breeder chooses to advance as opposed to those found in the entire population.
In what follows, whenever I refer to polygenic traits or diseases, I assume, along with mainstream biology, strong environmental interaction.
However, other traits are controlled by many genes and follow a normal distribution; these are polygenic traits.