Polyhymnia


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Polyhymnia

(pŏl'ĭhĭm`nēə): see MusesMuses,
in Greek religion and mythology, patron goddesses of the arts, daughters of Zeus and Mnemosyne. Originally only three, they were later considered as nine. Calliope was the Muse of epic poetry and eloquence; Euterpe, of music or of lyric poetry; Erato, of the poetry of
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.

Polyhymnia

(religion, spiritualism, and occult)

Polyhymnia, asteroid 33 (the 33rd asteroid to be discovered, on October 28, 1854), is approximately 62 kilometers in diameter and has an orbital period of 4.8 years. Polyhymnia is named after the Greek muse of singing, mime, rhetoric, and sacred dance, who was a daughter of Zeus and Mnemosyne and whose symbol is the veil. Like its mythological namesake, the asteroid Polyhymnia confers talent in singing, dance, mime, and rhetoric to natives in whose chart it is prominent.

Sources:

Kowal, Charles T. Asteroids: Their Nature and Utilization. Chichester, West Sussex, UK: Ellis Horwood Limited, 1988.
Room, Adrian. Dictionary of Astronomical Names. London: Routledge, 1988.
Schwartz, Jacob. Asteroid Name Encyclopedia. St. Paul, MN: Llewellyn Publications, 1995.

Polyhymnia

 

in Greek mythology, one of the nine Muses, the patroness of sacred hymns and of music.

Polyhymnia

muse of lyric poetry; presided over singing. [Gk. Myth.: Brewer Dictionary, 849]
See: Harmony

Polyhymnia

Muse of sacred song. [Gk. Myth.: Howe, 172]
See: Music

Polyhymnia

Greek myth the Muse of singing, mime, and sacred dance
References in periodicals archive ?
And this may be the consequence of Sancho's choice, since Polyhymnia (one of the muses he refused) presides over the sacred: a choice that leads to Sancho's lamentations.
I would argue that a judge should not take Polyhymnia as her muse, for judges are not principally the guardians of the sacred or the divine.
Polyhymnia begins her racing career in the fall of 2006 and the interest terminates upon the filly's retirement.
As Polyhymnia, Apollo's muse of pantomime, she danced with one finger pressed to her lips with finesse and charm.
He acknowledges that there is only one condition, namely that two of the daughters of Memory, the muses, Euterpe and Polyhymnia, should do their duty and guarantee "remembrance" of his work.
Michael Praetorius devotes substantial sections of the lengthy eighth chapter of Syntagma musicum, iii, part 3, to discussion of the use of trumpets and drums in numerous sacred compositions from his own Polyhymnia Heroica seu Fusicinia & Tympanistria I.
Between 1926 and 1936, she danced in twelve Balanchine ballets, creating the role of Polyhymnia in Apollon musagete (later Apollo) in 1928, and the Siren in Prodigal Son in 1929.
Arantxa Ochoa's Calliope and Amy Aldridge's Polyhymnia, as portrayed by these relative newcomers, were evocative of the muses.
Barker, whose crystalline technique was seen in New York City in 1993 at the Balanchine Celebration, when she danced Polyhymnia in a segment of Apollo, is very different on stage from Lallone, who is tall and leggy and projects a Bronteesque wildness with technique that is also marked by precision.