Popolo Grasso

Popolo Grasso

 

(literally, plump urban citizens), a stratum of wealthy townsmen in Italian communes of the 13th through 15th centuries.

REFERENCES

Gukovskii, M. A. Ital’ianskoe Vozrozhdenie, vol. 1. Leningrad, 1947. Pages 46–59 and 161–67.
Rutenburg, V. I. Narodnye dvizheniia v gorodakh Italii: XIVnachalo XV v. Moscow-Leningrad, 1958. Pages 72–73 and 293–327.
References in periodicals archive ?
Klapisch-Zuber concluded that baptismal kinship served to connect the neighborhood; and in the case of the popolo grasso (the governing elite), this formed webs of patronage and clientage.
Yet had the palace acquired the firm, enthusiastic support of the popolo grasso -- the dominant class of businessmen and professionals -- who remained the center of power all through the turmoil, exploiting della Bella until he threatened to become more of a liability than an asset, one can well imagine that the breakthrough of the project would have occurred during the reform movement.
To be sure, the popolo grasso and the magnati shared many economic and political goals; and the two groups engaged in much intermarriage, business associations, and mutual imitation of lifestyles, the magnati, in many cases, learning that hard work pays, and the popolo grasso imitating the chivalric, glamorous, and haughty ways of the magnati -- some so strongly that they were considered to "impersonate" them [49] and were thereby officially included in their numbers in 1293 by the Ordinances of Justice, which excluded the entire magnati class from high political office.
As the party rivalry became the center of political action in the otherwise quiet late 1290s, the popolo grasso inevitably beca me deeply coinvolved.