Port Jackson


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Port Jackson

or

Sydney Harbour,

inlet of the Pacific Ocean, 22 sq mi (57 sq km), 12 mi (19 km) long and 1.5 mi (2.4 km) wide at its mouth, New South Wales, Australia, forming Australia's finest harbor. The Parramatta River forms its western arm. Sydney on the south shore is connected with its northern suburbs by Sydney Harbour Bridge (1932), the second longest steel-arch bridge in the world, with an arch span of 1,650 ft (503 m).

Port Jackson

an inlet of the Pacific on the coast of SE Australia, forming a fine natural harbour: site of the city of Sydney, spanned by Sydney Harbour Bridge
References in periodicals archive ?
Mr Giles said Port Jackson Partners would deliver an initial report to Government in November with the scoping study to consider the economic and business case for the project, where trade might come from, ownership of the railway and the impact on new and existing freight users.
The first British colonists of Port Jackson (Hunter 1968 [1793]: 55 and notes therein; Collins 1975 [1798]: 487, 509; Tench 1979: 284 [1793: 191]) described three categories of shield according to their local Aboriginal names.
A visit to the English colony had not been foreseen in the official instructions drawn up for Baudin before he left France, but towards the end of his long and arduous reconnaissance of the western and southern coasts of New Holland he came to the decision that a stay at Port Jackson would enable him to re-provision and rest his men.
Captain James Cook in May 1770 had passed by the entrance to Sydney Harbour, which he named Port Jackson, (14) without entering it.
It arrived at Port Jackson (Sydney Harbour) on January 28, 1788.
She describes the arrival and gives a description description of Port Jackson.
9 Port Jackson lies at the centre of which world city?
Ms Starbuck's research topic is 'The Baudin Expedition's sojourn in colonial Port Jackson and the influence of that experience on the remaining voyage'.
They baked Lamingtons - a cake named after a governor of Queensland, Baron Lamington - and also learned about Australia Day, which commemorates the time Captain Phillips sailed into Port Jackson and launched the settlement which is now Sydney.
Inga Clendinnen's Dancing with Strangers: Europeans and Australians at First Contact is a beautifully written account of cross-cultural relations between British and Aboriginal people in eastern Australia from 1788 to 1796, the years in which the British established the penal colony of Port Jackson.
The author provides more than a technical description of the forts and guns of Sydney Harbour-he unfolds the complex military, political, social and economic factors which shaped the establishment of the defences, retelling the story behind the countless schemes, reports, inquiries, appreciations and commissions relating to the defences of Port Jackson.
As Jack Brook's recent investigations show, practically the only source of information about the two visitors from Port Jackson is in official documents relating to the payment of their expenses (Brook 2001).