posthole

(redirected from Postholes)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus.

posthole

[′pōst‚hōl]
(civil engineering)
A hole bored in the ground to hold a fence post.
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
From digging holes for footings when building decks or sheds, to setting fence corner braces and gates, rural people are not strangers to digging postholes by hand and setting posts below the frost line.
Right: In this 1943 photo, Edgar Stout is at the wheel of his Ford-Ferguson 9N with homemade posthole digger.
A concentration of three well-preserved postholes in the northwestern corner seems to suggest this area towards the back of the structure was roofed.
Although no unique features were identified at Vainu'u, features not present at Vainu'u were identified at Aganoa and To'aga in association with pottery: an ili'ili surface and shell midden were identified at Aganoa; while shell middens, pits and postholes associated with possible residential structures were identified at To'aga.
6,18) During posthole preparation, the intraradicular smear layer formed was thicker than those observed in coronal cavities.
I have identified three ways to dig poetic postholes in the social studies curriculum, which I introduce next with examples that invite students to relate with history more intimately.
Postholes, which can be drilled with a hydraulic auger, should be five to six feet deep.
When my mother visited and Michael explained the layers of earth, the postholes, walls and pits we would listen with wonder, peering over the edge, not getting too close for fear of falling in.
At the beginning of our construction work, Nizam measured seven hands (10 and a half feet) on a 15-foot bamboo pole, laid the pole on the ground as a guide and commenced digging postholes in the soft earth at 2-and-a-half-foot intervals.
Sometimes I get so mad I just go out and dig postholes, chop firewood, and break wild horses to get rid of my frustration.
Nearby were postholes of a palisade which had, to one side of it, two sockets for images--"exactly the kind of thing you would find outside of a chiefly compound," Dye says.