Postlude


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Postlude

 

a supplementary section of a musical work; most often, the instrumental conclusion of a vocal composition (an art song or a song). Sometimes, the postlude is used in instrumental works (Hindemith’s Ludus Tonalis [Play of Tonalities] for piano).

References in periodicals archive ?
She divides the melody into two parts, a and b, and uses the b section as the main melodic material in the introduction, interlude and postlude.
The enthusiasm with which the dancer recounts the genesis, zenith, and glorious postlude of his performing history is the same quality that attracted choreographers and thrilled audiences for almost four decades.
and a more specific postlude section that concludes the singular Return
There are also Artist Showcase concerts at Holley Hall (June 1, 8 and 15) and, of course, free concerts presented by the festival's talented students, June 4, 8, 10, 15 and 16, along with the popular Student Postlude Performances following the concerts on June 2, 9 and 16.
However, in the postlude of a pontificate which saw the canonization of several married saints, perhaps Alfred would have had a higher rating with John Paul II.
In another attempt to capture a bit of Hollywood stardust, the Philharmonic has augmented its opening-night, all-Beethoven gala with actor Ed Harris (``The Hours,'' ``Pollack''), who will read letters by the composer as prelude and postlude to music performed by the orchestra and piano soloist Evgeny Kissin.
No matter: there is a momentous postlude to Gould's attack.
The second Postlude is performed by Simon Fordham on solo violin, while the third is performed by Ms.
Finally, there is a postlude in which Jacobs takes up the effects of charitable interpretation on its practitioners, and he ends by suggesting the deeply comedic nature of that interpretation.
The postlude that forms the second half of the volume is not easy reading for those of us unschooled in Christology or Catholic theology.
Hemingway's unpublished postlude meshes seamlessly with the published novel precisely because a desire for narrative authenticity informs the text both thematically--with its recurring attention to "real" expression, literary and otherwise--and formally, with its sharp focus on the mechanics of reproducing "real" expression.
As Jordan notes in the postlude to The Invention of Sodomy, the Christian theological tradition is nowhere more problematic than in its elaboration of ideas concerning sex difference, reproduction, and the family; these are areas in which strong social and secular pressures turned Christianity away from its initial focus on spiritual love and family and moved it in the direction of a kind of fertility cult, which insisted on the teleological joining of sex and reproduction.