postpartum depression

(redirected from Postnatal depression)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Financial, Wikipedia.

postpartum depression

[‚pōs¦pärd·əm di′presh·ən]
(psychology)
Any acute depression occurring within approximately 3 months following childbirth.
References in periodicals archive ?
It also discovered that the greater the difficulty or pain experienced the greater the risk of postnatal depression.
With Koa I suffered from postnatal depression for about seven months of his life and I think the biggest thing about that was I didn't understand what I was going through because not a lot of people speak about it.
These figures are consistent with those internationally--a large meta-analysis of 59 international studies concluded that the international prevalence rate of postnatal depression was 13 per cent (O'Hara et al, 1996).
Mark Williams, from Ogmore Vale, Bridgend, saw his wife Michelle, now 38, go through postnatal depression after needing a traumatic emergency Caesarean when giving birth to their son, Ethan, in December 2004.
Peer volunteers who recovered from postnatal depression were trained as peer support and provided an average of nine support calls.
Synopsis: Taking in many different perspectives, "Sad Dad: An Exploration of Postnatal Depression in Fathers" sheds light on the many aspects of postnatal depression in fathers--an unknown subject to many people.
In most cases, these feelings pass within weeks but for mothers with postnatal depression, things do not improve.
There are more than 47, 655 women in 2013 who are experiencing postnatal depression according to Deloitte and ABS data analysis.
Postnatal depression (sometimes called PND) is an illness that affects around one in 10 women after they have a baby.
Revised and updated for this edition, this guide demonstrates the use of the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale, a 10-item self-report questionnaire meant to screen for postpartum depression in primary and secondary health care settings.
Her mother was previously admitted to the Psychiatric Hospital for postnatal depression.