posttranslational modification

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posttranslational modification

[‚pōs·tranz¦lā·shən·əl ‚mäd·ə·fə′kā·shən]
(cell and molecular biology)
Any polypeptide alteration that occurs after synthesis of the chain.
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S-Nitrosylation of cysteine residues as posttranslational modification influence cardiac function includes receptors, enzymes, ion channels, transcription factors, and structural proteins [116].
Among the posttranslational modifications, glycosylation can be critical, not only for immunogenicity that it can enhance or conceal immunogenic epitopes but also to modulate biological activity (20).
Sub-cellular localization and posttranslational modifications of the Plasmodium yoelii enolase suggest moonlighting functions.
Despite many investigations dealing with genetics, proteomics, and posttranslational modifications, we still have not identified targets for improved treatment of these malignancies, and only a few biomarkers have been introduced as prognostic factors.
In fact, biologics are rarely, if ever, limited to a single defined entity; typically, biologics contain a range of discrete molecular entities, differing in posttranslational modifications or other minor structural features.
A speculation on the source of these antibodies suggests that posttranslational modifications (glycosylation and phosphorylation) of some proteins may create neo-epitopes for the production of autoantibodies (14, 15).
These results suggest that the antiproliferative effect of VACM-1/Cul5 is dependent on its posttranslational modifications and will help in the design of new anticancer therapeutics that target the Nedd8 pathway.
Of these identified proteins, enzyme digestions and chemical oxidation suggest posttranslational modifications of some proteins e.
The phosphorylated posttranslational modifications of IK have been shown to be regulated by casein kinase II (CKII) throughout the primary sequence.
Alcohol can regulate a membrane-bound ion channel in several ways: by changing the activity of proteins through posttranslational modifications, interacting with membrane lipids, interacting with auxiliary proteins, modulation of membrane protein expression (i.
Coverage begins with blood components and blood plasma proteins, followed by discussion of domains, motifs and repeats; protein families; and posttranslational modifications.
Among the epigenome which is defined by DNA methylation patterns and the associated posttranslational modifications of histories and non histone proteins is the key regulatory circuit (2).

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