Potidaea


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Related to Potidaea: Chaeronea, Aegospotami, Nicias

Potidaea

(pŏtĭdē`ə), ancient city, NE Greece, at the narrowest point of the Pallene (now Kassándra) peninsula in Chalcidice (now Khalkidhikí). It was a Corinthian colony (c.600 B.C.) but joined the Athenian-dominated Delian League. Potidaea revolted (432) against Athens with Corinthian help, providing one of the incitements to the Peloponnesian WarPeloponnesian War
, 431–404 B.C., decisive struggle in ancient Greece between Athens and Sparta. It ruined Athens, at least for a time. The rivalry between Athens' maritime domain and Sparta's land empire was of long standing. Athens under Pericles (from 445 B.C.
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. Athens recaptured (430 or 429) the city. Philip IIPhilip II,
382–336 B.C., king of Macedon (359–336 B.C.), son of Amyntas II. While a hostage in Thebes (367–364), he gained much knowledge of Greece and its people.
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 of Macedon took (356) Potidaea and may have destroyed it in the ensuing war. Rebuilt by Cassander, the city was named Cassandreia.

Potidaea

 

(Poteidaia or Potidaia), an ancient Greek city on the Pallini (Kassandra) Peninsula of Chalcidice. Founded circa 600 B.C. by the Corinthians, Potidaea became a member of the Delian League. However, because of an increase in the phoros (the annual levy required from league members) and interference by Athens in the city’s domestic affairs, Potidaea seceded from the league in 432 B.C. This action was one of the causes of the Peloponnesian War of 431–404 B.C.

References in periodicals archive ?
Sediment on the northern Greek peninsula where Potidaea and the modern town of Nea Poteidaia are located shows signs of massive marine events, such as large waves, the Aachen study found.
Socrates speaks of Potidaea to an audience that includes not only Chaerephon, an extreme democrat, but also Critias and Charmides, two who would later be members of the oligarchic Thirty Tyrants who ruled Athens so ruthlessly in the wake of its defeat in the Peloponnesian War.
43) Alcibiades won the aristeia at Potidaea (Plato Symp.
Neither type of "cause" works independently of the other: without the separate conflicts over Corcyra and Potidaea, the structural cause would have had no effect; without the Athenians "becoming great" and their fear of the Peloponnesians, the conflicts of the mid- and late 430s would have been inconsequential.
Principal battles: Potidaea (near Thessaloniki) (432); Delium (424); Abydos (Kanakkale) (411); Cyzicus (410); Ephesus (406).
6) His Pentecontaetia, or history of the fifty years between the end of the Persian Wars and the crises over Corcyra and Potidaea at the outbreak of the Second Peloponnesian War, was designed to prove that thesis.
In the fifteenth, in the forty-eighth year of the priestess-ship of Chrysis at Argos, in the ephorate of Aenesias at Sparta, in the last month but two of the archonship of Pythodorus at Athens, and six months after the battle of Potidaea, just at the beginning of spring (Thuc.
The ante-bellum events at Megara, Potidaea and Corcyra (Thuc.
For in the only two dialogues in which Plato shows Socrates voluntarily leaving the city (in contrast to his military service at Potidaea and Delium), the Parmenides and the Phaedrus, Plato shows that Socrates is drawn out of Athens by a desire to hear what another has written.
In the same year he attempted to take Potidaea, attacking by night with a [GREEK TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII] (`ladder') placed at the point that `the guard carrying the [GREEK TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII] (`bell') had just quitted', but was spotted before he could climb up and had to withdraw (Thuc.
Revised in Badian's From Plataea to Potidaea (Baltimore, 1993), pp.
Potidaea and Plataea had been lost, Attica repeatedly laid waste, and an overcrowded Athens ravaged by plague.