practical reasoning

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practical reasoning

  1. thought directed to, and having outcomes in, social activity. This usage originates in PHILOSOPHY where it is contrasted with ‘theoretical reason’, considered as describing the world and its contents. Practical reason, by contrast, either emanates directly in action, or brings an immediate pressure to bear on it. It thus subsumes: considerations of the 'self realizing and maximizing its goods, ‘prudence’, and considerations that restrict or encourage action or restraint from action in relation to others, i.e. ‘morality’. The most dramatic claims to a special status for practical reason derive from Aristotle's proposal ofa practical syllogism, separate from theoretical syllogisms, in which an action itself (not a description or specification of an action) is held to follow logically from precedent premises, often summarized as a ‘desire’ and a ‘belief. The effect is to render action itself’logical’, and this is held by some to be the source of the ‘meanings’ of action. Such logical connection is then held (e.g. Von Wright, 1971) to mark the fundamental difference between the explanation of human activity and the explanation of natural events (see also MEANINGFUL UNDERSTANDING AND EXPLANATION).
  2. mundane or everyday thought in social situations. This ethnomethodological usage takes practical reasoning to be the central feature of routine social organization, and hence the subject matter of serious empirical sociology (see ETHNOMETHODOLOGY).
References in periodicals archive ?
The problem is that, first, this only narrows but does not close the gap, and second, and more fundamentally, our first-order practical reason can give no weight to such a presumption because the presumption competes with our first-order practical reasoning.
49) This aspect of determination is what enables practical reason, in the guise of rational principles, to be the "efficient cause" of our actions.
Raz (1975) Practical Reason and Norms, London: Hutchinson & Co.
Ross's basic definition of practical reason (cognition) is as follows:
Practical reason involves separating ourselves from our desires in the light of the recognition of goods that may or may not be in keeping with those desires--though importantly this recognition does not rule out the possibility that those goods become objects of desire themselves.
Chapter 4, 'Kantian Tragic Form and Kantian "Storytelling"', encapsulates the story (told in the Critique of Practical Reason, KW 5:88) of the melancholic, empty, lost man who feels that life is pointless.
29) Third, "[a]ll other precepts of the natural law are based upon this: so that whatever the practical reason naturally apprehends as man's good (or evil) belongs to the precepts of the natural law as something to be done or avoided.
First, it emphasizes obedience, law and hierarchical authority, and thus departs from the Catholic tradition's close linkage of conscience, practical reason and freedom.
The formal principle of pure practical reason is the formal principle of transcendentally free agency.
He writes in his concluding essay, "I am committed to holding that if the requirements of practical reason are rightly understood, then practical rationality provides everything that is required for the moral life, independently of any theological ethics.
Kant's path of reflection in the Critique of Practical Reason is thus of an elucidation of the practical faculty of reason as it is manifest in the authority of the moral law, which "in fact" asserts itself as a source of determination independent of any empirical condition, thus "freely.
CAN Richard Burden MP explain to the people of Northfield any practical reason to spend hundreds of thousands of pounds of taxpayers' money on alterations to the perfectly working Bristol Road running through Northfield village shopping centre, and in the process depriving disabled drivers parking?

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