prayer book

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prayer book

1. Ecclesiast a book containing the prayers used at church services or recommended for private devotions
2. Church of England another name for Book of Common Prayer
References in periodicals archive ?
The Jewish prayer book (siddur) includes statements of thanksgiving.
In 1980 the Church brought in a new prayer book, the Alternative Service Book, with a new marriage service and a new form of wording for the banns.
Some of the extraordinary and beautifully-preserved pieces on show include a prayer book belonging to Cardinal Wolsey, the cardinal to Henry VIII, dating between 1400-1420, and a book of hours signed by Elizabeth Plantagenet (Elizabeth of York).
When officers arrived, they found the building ransacked and the scrolls, worth an estimated $100,000, torn and damaged, along with the prayer books and other items.
SIR - While I accept Roy Humphries' point (Letters, Tuesday, October 4) that the preface to the 1549 Prayer Book does not actually state the compilers' desire for regular revision, he should bear in mind that I was responding to James Cole's assertion that the Book of Common Prayer is normative for Anglican worship.
To take one example, Scottish Prayer Books are sometimes listed with official English books and sometimes under separate headings.
Bernard Muir's "The Early Insular Prayer Book Tradition and the Development of the Book of Hours" sets the stage for the subsequent essays, showing that the personal aspect of devotion so characteristic of the book of hours was already well established by the eighth and ninth centuries in some early English insular prayer books, most notably the Galba prayer book of the eleventh century.
They bought the books from the All Sikh Women's Organisation, which aims to supply hospitals across the country with prayer books.
OTC Bulletin Board: MXII), today announced that it has completed English translations of five of the Private Prayer Books of His Holiness, Pope John Paul II.
Chapter 3 examines meditational practices associated with prayer books illustrated with narrative sequences.
There are management prayer books, management murder mysteries, management literary criticism, management mysticism, and a vast outpouring of management social theory in which this or that bit of stale, fifty-year-old thought is retrofitted with the logic and language of the cubicle and offered up as the latest in power thinking.