predation

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predation

[prə′dā·shən]
(biology)
The killing and eating of an individual of one species by an individual of another species.
References in periodicals archive ?
Interaction term between predator and prey sizes was not included in the model because there were not enough degrees of freedom for interaction term.
The dotted line shows what the relationship would look like if predator and prey increased proportionately.
Towards a predator-prey model incorporating age structure: the effects of predator and prey size on the predation of Daphnia magna by Ischnura elegans.
sexmaculata (control) indicated existence of some trophic link between the predator and prey species.
What happened to the average speed of the predator and prey population in your game?
As a movie for all ages, Madagascar especially to be commended in that it does not pretend that predator/prey relationships do not exist, even in a movie that features predator and prey animals as friends, and Madagascar: The Essential Guide makes a note of this.
It is hoped that the experiments will eventually show the predator and prey robots mimicking behaviour seen in the natural world such as prey herding for protection and the predators using pack strategies.
If stochasticity in primary productivity is superimposed on a long-term cycle, which might be caused by cyclical variation in climate, for example, the cycle may be seen in the predator and prey populations (Figure 3c).
The results confirm that a variety of stable and locally unstable dynamics can be generated by optimal breeding decisions of predator and prey, as suspected by the general analysis of reshaping the density dependence of population growth.
These results stand in contrast to recent models of adaptive change in continuous traits of either predators (Abrams 1992) or both predator and prey species (Saloniemi 1993; Dieckmann et al.
In their words: ``In the wild, the relationship between predator and prey defines the daily routine of virtually every animal alive.
Disturbing this balance can have disastrous consequences for both predator and prey, he says.