predator

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predator

any carnivorous animal

predator

[′pred·əd·ər]
(ecology)
An animal that preys on other animals as a source of food.
References in periodicals archive ?
Conservation Minister Maggie Barry and Associate Conservation Minister Nicky Wagner have presented traps to two community groups at a Predator Free 2050 event in Christchurch today.
After the Penguins outscored the Predators by a combined scored of 9-4 in Games 1 and 2, the Predators followed it up by outscoring the Penguins, 9-1, in Games 3 and 4.
These findings could be helpful for management of cereal aphids by exploiting ground-dwelling predators as biological agent in wheat fields.
To get an idea of how snails respond to predators, the team looked at how pond snails, or Lymnaea stagnalis, responded to smell from a predatory fish, tench.
The ability of prey to recognize and respond to predators is vital for their survival (Lima and Dill 1990).
PAUL TROUT'S BOOK ON ANIMAL PREDATORS AND MYTH is well researched and presented in such a way that it is informative and entertaining.
Biologists have tended to focus on the direct effects of predators killing prey, says evolutionary ecologist Thomas Martin of the U.
The two groups were separated so that while the dragonflies could see and smell their predators, the predators could not actually eat them.
From the tropics up to the arctic, from the oceans to the higher mountains, regardless of the ecosystem we're seeing that the presence or the absence of these apex predators can be extremely important.
It is expected that restoration efforts will force avocets and stilts to nest in greater densities within remaining salt ponds, and density-dependent predation on nests may occur if predators increase use of these areas as they encounter more densely clustered nests (Lariviere and Messier, 1998, 2001).
Sticky Blood Shuts Down Would-Be Rootworm Predators
Washington, June 9 (ANI): A Swedish study from Uppsala University has shown that Siberian jays use over a dozen different calls to communicate the level of danger and predator category to other members of their own group when mobbing predators.