fetal alcohol syndrome

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fetal alcohol syndrome

(FAS), pattern of physical, developmental, and psychological abnormalities seen in babies born to mothers who consumed alcohol during pregnancypregnancy,
period of time between fertilization of the ovum (conception) and birth, during which mammals carry their developing young in the uterus (see embryo). The average duration of pregnancy in humans is about 280 days, equal to 9 calendar months.
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. The abnormalities include low birthweight, facial deformities, and mental retardation, and there appears to be an association with impulsive behavior, anxiousness, and an inability on the part of the affected children to understand the consequences of their actions. When some but not all of these abnormalities are present, they are referred to as fetal alcohol effects (FAE). FAE has been observed in children of mothers who drank as little as two drinks per week during pregnancy. FAS affects 1 to 2 babies per 1,000 born worldwide. Many require constant lifelong supervision and end up institutionalized because of dysfunction in the family. FAS was first defined as a syndrome in 1973, although it has been observed for centuries. See also alcoholismalcoholism,
disease characterized by impaired control over the consumption of alcoholic beverages. Alcoholism is a serious problem worldwide; in the United States the wide availability of alcoholic beverages makes alcohol the most accessible drug, and alcoholism is the most
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.

Bibliography

See M. Dorris, The Broken Cord: A Family's Ongoing Struggle with Fetal Alcohol Syndrome (1989).

fetal alcohol syndrome

[‚fēd·əl ′al·kə‚hȯl ‚sin‚drōm]
(medicine)
A spectrum of changes in the offspring of women who consume alcoholic beverages during pregnancy, ranging from mild mental changes to severe growth deficiency, mental retardation, and abnormal facial features.

fetal alcohol syndrome

a condition in newborn babies caused by excessive intake of alcohol by the mother during pregnancy: characterized by various defects including mental retardation
References in periodicals archive ?
Major finding: Young adults who had had physical or cognitive effects from prenatal alcohol exposure had summary math scores that were 10%-11% lower than those in unexposed peers and 3%-4% lower than those in peers who had had childhood disabilities.
Prenatal alcohol use: The role of lifetime problems with alcohol, drugs, depression, and violence.
Simple changes to the prenatal record, such as inclusion of an alcohol screening tool, may facilitate population-wide identification for prenatal alcohol exposure and implementation of strategies to promote risk-reducing health behaviours.
The results of an intention-to-treat analysis showed a significant interaction between the intervention and prenatal alcohol consumption, Dr.
Mental handicaps and hyperactivity are probably the most debilitating aspects of FAS, and prenatal alcohol exposure is one of the leading known causes of mental retardation in the Western World.
And of the 31 children who had been recognized before referral as affected by prenatal alcohol exposure, 10 had their fetal alcohol spectrum disorder (FASD) diagnoses changed within the spectrum, representing a misdiagnosis rate of 6.
Key words: Fetal alcohol spectrum disorders; prenatal alcohol exposure; fetal alcohol effects; developmental alcohol exposure; developmental disorder; diagnosis; treatment; intervention; human studies; clinical studies; animal models; literature review
1) However, this message of abstinence faces some criticism, as 1) it can be unrealistic for some; 2) it ignores the uncertainties discussed above; and 3) it can present an obstacle to informed choice for women as it fails to acknowledge the complexity of the evidence about the effects of prenatal alcohol exposure.
FASD], the umbrella term for the range of disabilities that can result from prenatal alcohol exposure, represents the leading cause of preventable developmental disabilities in the world," according to an NIH statement.
I read it soon after it was published and concluded that the described correlation between prenatal alcohol exposure and school shooters cried out for serious research.
This edition adds new research, including cell-based strategies for infant lung function, epigenetics, and prenatal alcohol exposure on lung development and function.