Primer

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primer

1
an introductory text, such as a school textbook

primer

2
a substance, such as paint, applied to a surface as a base, sealer, etc.

Primer

 

(in blasting work), part of an explosive charge that is provided with a detonator or a demolition cord and is designed to detonate the principal charge in a shothole, drillhole, or chamber. Primers are generally made in the form of cartridges. As starters for low-sensitivity explosives (ammonium nitrite fuel oil and various types of granulite) primers are also used in the form of demolition blocks made of Tetryl, trotyl, or a fusion of the latter with cyclonite.


Primer

 

a textbook designed to teach reading and writing; a primary handbook for developing language and logical thinking in children.

Illustrated primers are also among the initial means of aesthetic education. The teaching of reading and writing is accomplished by various methods (the syllabic method, the phonetic method, the “whole-words method,” and so on); the corresponding primers are written for each method. The phonetic, analytic-synthetic method, which is the basis on which modern Soviet primers are compiled, is the most feasible method of teaching reading and writing.

The first Slavic-Russian primers were the alphabet-grammar of Ivan Fedorov (L’vov, 1574), the primer of Lavrentii Zizanii (Vil’no, 1596), and the similar primer of V. Burtsov (Moscow, 1634). In the 17th century the best primer was the illustrated one by Karion Istomin (1694); it contained drawings of the objects in each lesson. In the 16th to 18th centuries, primers were composed according to the letter-by-letter method. In the mid-19th century primers composed according to the syllabic method and then the phonetic method (F. Studitskii, 1846; V. Zolotov, 1860) appeared. In 1864, K. D. Ushinskii created the first Russian primer constructed according to the analytic-synthetic sound method. The New Alphabet by L. N. Tolstoi, compiled according to the so-called aural method, appeared in 1875. The successors of Ushinskii (N. F. Bunakov, V. P. Vakhterov, V. A. Flerov, and others) made a number of improvements in the analytic-synthetic sound method and in primers themselves.

The first Soviet primers, compiled according to the so-called whole-words method, were replaced in 1932 by primers in which the analytic-synthetic sound method was revived (P. O. Afanas’ev and N. A. Kostin). Since then all primers have been compiled according to this method. In 1937 the primers of A. V. Iankovskaia and N. M. Golovin were approved, and in 1945 they were replaced by the primers of A. I. Voskresenskaia and S. P. Redozubov. The Academy of Pedagogical Sciences created a primer (1953) and a new standard grammar (1965) based on Redozubov’s primer. This latest grammar was the first in which the Academy of Arts and Soviet writers participated; as a result, this primer is distinguished from earlier ones by its abundance of artistic texts and color pictures illustrating objects and concepts. The Academy of Pedagogical Sciences of the USSR is conducting further experimental work on the improvement of primers.

REFERENCES

Redozubov, S. P. “Metodika obucheniia chteniiu i pis’mu v nachal’noi shkole.” Izbr. trudy. Moscow, 1961.
Iankovskaia, A. V. “Bukvar’.” In Pedagogicheskaia entsiklopediia, vol. 1. Moscow, 1964.

L. K. NAZAROVA


Primer

 

a thin metal or plastic cap equipped with a percussion charge (mostly mercury fulminate).

Figure 1. (a) Primer in a live cartridge: (1) powder charge. (2) anvil. (3) primer; (b) in a primer sleeve: (1) compacted powder cake, (2) primer; (c) in a blasting cap: (1) primer, (2) time fuse, (3) detonator, (4) case, (5) auxiliary detonator

The primer was invented by the Englishman J. Egg in 1818. Primers are divided into percussion (blasting) caps and detonators. The percussion cap is used in small arms cartridges and artillery ammunition (in igniters and fuses) for igniting charges. The detonating cap is designed to excite detonation and is used in blasting work and in artillery ammunition fuses, hand grenades, and mines. The primer is activated by the impact or prick of a firing pin, or by fire, and requires special precautions during handling. Primers are also used in hunting ammunition.

primer

[′prīm·ər]
(materials)
A prefinishing coat applied to surfaces that are to be painted or otherwise finished. Also known as prime coat.
(cell and molecular biology)
A short ribonucleic acid (RNA) sequence that is complementary to a sequence of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) and has a 3′-OH terminus at which a DNA polymerase begins synthesis of a DNA chain.
A short sequence of DNA that is complementary to a messenger RNA (mRNA) sequence and enables reverse transcriptase to begin copying the neighboring sequences of mRNA.
A transfer RNA whose elongation starts RNA-directed DNA synthesis in retroviruses.
(engineering)
In general, a small, sensitive initial explosive train component which on being actuated initiates functioning of the explosive train, and will not reliably initiate high explosive charge; classified according to the method of initiation, for example, percussion primer, electric primer, or friction primer.

primer

1. A paint, applied as a first coat, which serves the function of sealing and filling on wood, plaster, and masonry; inhibits rust and improves the adhesion of subsequent coats of paint on metal surfaces.
2. A thin liquid bitumen solvent; applied to a roof surface to absorb dust and to improve the adhesion of subsequent applications of bitumen.
3. A cartridge or container of explosives into which a detonator or detonating cord is inserted or attached.
References in classic literature ?
These young ladies--not supposed to have been actually christened by the names applied to them, though always so called in the family from the places of their birth in barracks--are respectively employed on three-legged stools, the younger (some five or six years old) in learning her letters out of a penny primer, the elder
He spoke as though he had been reading from a child's Primer.
Petrushka could read and write and knew Paulson's primer, his only book, almost by heart, and he was fond of quoting sayings from it that he thought suited the occasion, especially when he had had something to drink, as to-day.
He can read his primer, and I have brought down my Virgil.
Ann Shirley must learn to control her temper," and then read it out loud so that even the primer class, who couldn't read writing, should understand it.
When Tarzan first put it into the written language of his own people he had not yet chanced upon either WHITE or SKIN in the dictionary; but in a primer he had seen the picture of a little white boy and so he wrote his name BUMUDE-MUTOMURO, or he-boy.
Next I pried the primer, or cap, from the shell, and laid it on the rock, in the midst of the scattered powder.
Now, William Dobbin, from an incapacity to acquire the rudiments of the above language, as they are propounded in that wonderful book the Eton Latin Grammar, was compelled to remain among the very last of Doctor Swishtail's scholars, and was "taken down" continually by little fellows with pink faces and pinafores when he marched up with the lower form, a giant amongst them, with his downcast, stupefied look, his dog's-eared primer, and his tight corduroys.
Make-up artists use clever lightreflecting primers to recreate this youthful look.
The additions, along with two established and highly effective primers, have enhanced the Vibrance Collection brand and work together to open up imaginative refinish possibilities.
This week we are all about the base as our testers try out three foundation primers.
PPG Industries' protective and marine coatings (PMC) business announced that four individual coatings and primers and two combined coating-and-primer systems have been certified by NSF International for water-tank applications.