inclusion-exclusion principle

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inclusion-exclusion principle

[¦in‚klü·zhən ′eks‚klü·zhən ‚prin·sə·pəl]
(mathematics)
The principle that, if A and B are finite sets, the number of elements in the union of A and B can be obtained by adding the number of elements in A to the number of elements in B, and then subtracting from this sum the number of elements in the intersection of A and B.
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This book supplies students with 112 introductory to intermediate combinatorial problems drawn from the AwesomeMath summer program, as well as tools for solving counting problems, proof techniques, and examples related counting basics, permutations and combinations, multinomials, the principle of inclusion-exclusion, Pascal's triangle and the binomial theorem, the double counting principle, the pigeonhole principle, induction, recurrence relations, graph theory, invariants, combinatorial geometry, generating functions, and probabilities and probabilistic method.
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