Pritchardia


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Pritchardia

 

a genus of palms having a columnar bole reaching 10 m tall. The fan-shaped leaves measure 1 to 1.5 m across. There are about 37 species, distributed mainly on the Hawaiian Islands. Two species are encountered on the Fiji Islands, and two on the Tuamotu Islands. The palms grow primarily in moist tropical forests; a few species are found in mountains at elevations of 300 to 1,500 m. Fans and various woven products are made from the leaves of P. pacifica and other species.

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magnifolia (na'ena'e), Dubautia waialealae (na'ena'e), Geranium kauaiense (nohoanu), Keysseria erici, Keysseria, helenae, Labordia helleri (kamakahala), Labordia pumila (kamakahala), Lysimachia daphnoides (lehua makanoe), Melicope degeneri (alani), Melicope paniculata (alani), Melicope puberula (alani), Myrsine mezii (kolea), Pittosporum napaliense (ho'awa), Platydesma rostrata (pilo kea lau li'i), Pritchardia hardyi (loulu), Psychotria grandiflora (kopiko), Psychotria hobdyi (kopiko), Schiedea attenuata, Stenogyne kealiae, Cyanea kolekoleensis, Cyanea dolichopoda, Cyrtandra paliku, Diellia mannii, Doryopteris angelica, Dryopteris crinalis var.
indica in Florida include ornamental palms such as the Fiji fan palm Pritchardia pacifica Seem.
dragon plum (Dracontomelon vidense), red-bead tree (Adenanthera pavonina), and a number of palms, including the betelnut (Areca catechu) and Pritchardia and Veitchia spp.
Of the world's 2,700 palm species, about 224 are highly threatened with extinction, according to the International Union for Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources, including 15 of Hawaii's 23 native Pritchardia species.
Three of the plant species-Amaranthus brownii, Pritchardia remota or loulu, and Schiedea verticillata--are found only on the northwestern Hawaiian islands.
Thus, Pritchardia values seem to change out of phase with most of the other types, possibly suggesting short-term climate fluctuations rather than a drying out of the sinkhole.
But the new Cook Pine Trail (less than 1/4 mile long) leads past a small collection of native plants such as Hibiscus waimeae and Pritchardia.
2008) reported that removal of the operculum followed by incubation at high temperatures (25-35[degrees]C) resulted in high germination percentages in Pritchardia remota palm seeds.
Three of the plant species--Amaranthus brownii, Pritchardia remora or loulu, and Schiedea verticillata--are found only on the northwestern Hawaiian islands.