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1. Maths a statement requiring a solution usually by means of one or more operations or geometric constructions
2. designating a literary work that deals with difficult moral questions



in the broad sense, a complex theoretical or practical question requiring study and a solution. In science, a problem consists in a contradictory situation that arises in the form of opposing views to the explanation of any given phenomenon, object, or process and that requires an adequate theory for its solution. A key prerequisite for the solution of a problem is its correct statement or formulation. An incorrectly stated problem merely detracts attention from the solution of the real problem. [21–8—4]

References in classic literature ?
Here was the new problem, and a most stupendous one--how to link together three telephones, or three hundred, or three thousand, or three million, so that any two of them could be joined at a moment's notice.
It is to be regretted that a portion of our community should be practically in slavery, but to propose to solve the problem by enslaving the entire community is childish.
It would seem very strange, she thought, to have so few things to care for and she wondered how she would fill her time, she whose one problem always had been how to achieve snatches of leisure.
The solution of this problem is our immediate duty.
On Hesiod, the Hesiodic poems and the problems which these offer see Rzach's most important article "Hesiodos" in Pauly-Wissowa, "Real-Encyclopadie" xv (1912).
I should be delighted to look into any problem which you might submit to me.
he said once again, while rolling a cigarette and as he pondered the problem of getting back.
The problem before us," continued the president, "is how to communicate to a projectile a velocity of 12,000 yards per second.
These raise problems of their own, which we shall reach in Lecture III.
No; these revelations, unless I greatly err, are meant merely to promote the intellectual satisfaction of all intelligent beings, who will stand waiting, on that day, to see the dark problem of this life made plain.
As a matter of fact it was about the only kind of logic that could be brought to bear upon my problem.
At first sight the difference does not seem great in either line of dealing with the difficult problem of limitations.

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