procedural programming


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procedural programming

[prə‚sē·jə·rəl ′prō‚gram·iŋ]
(computer science)
A list of instructions telling a computer, step-by-step, what to do, usually having a linear order of execution from the first statement to the second and so forth with occasional loops and branches. Procedural programming languages include C, C++, Fortran, Pascal, and Basic.
References in periodicals archive ?
While writing robotics programs, students experience quite a bit of difficulty with conventional procedural programming because of its weakness in handling or controlling reactivity that is a basic functional requirement for robotics control [9][12].
For reactive control, rule-based programming has an advantage over procedural programming [12].
Accordingly, the pairs of flowchart and Interactive C [40] for procedural programming, LD and Structured Text (ST) [38] for rule-based programming, and FSD and our State-Based Squeak for state-based programming were adopted.
The experimental group was given the state-based programming environment while the control group was given a conventional procedural programming environment.
That is, they learned sequencing and repetition in procedural programming through an educational programming language.
However, the control group used repeat structures and escaping repetition command "exit loop" according to the procedural programming system, while the experimental group used state scripts and the state transition command "transit to" according to the State-Based Squeak.
This study considered reactivity as an integral part of procedural programming, and developed State-Based Squeak to support robot programming.
Actually, even in procedural programming, not all procedure and variables are visible.
The main point is that, in procedural programming, the interaction of data and code is governed by implementation details, such as the source file in which a variable is defined.
Pencel's mobile application development tool, Kinectivity Studio, gives enterprises and their solutions providers a single visual environment to easily create custom mobile applications without the requirement of procedural programming.
This means applications can be adapted continuously to fit changing business needs, something that is extremely cumbersome with traditional procedural programming techniques that form the heart of most business applications today.