coefficient of determination

(redirected from Proportion of variation)
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coefficient of determination

[¦kō·ə′fish·ənt əv di‚tər·mə′nā·shən]
(statistics)
A statistic which indicates the strength of fit between two variables implied by a particular value of the sample correlation coefficient r. Designated by r 2.
References in periodicals archive ?
Seed weight (47%), flowering time (47%) and pod weight (39%) showed the greatest proportion of variation between sites, while traits with a low proportion of variation between sites were number of pod segments (12%), not sure proportion of leaf (9%) and pod length (16%).
Stepwise regression analysis was also performed to estimate the proportion of variation in the sensory evaluation of pork loin tenderness explained by both WBS and TPA parameters (Table 6).
The explained Level-1 proportion of variation due to variables at the household level was 5%.
The authors' research suggest that information contained in Annual Financial Reports (AFRs) in its present form explain small proportion of variation in market prices of publicity-quoted companies, indicating that the information contained in these reports may be inadequate for the users' needs.
The estimate of the proportion of variation in liability for disordered gambling due to genetic influences was 49.
The squared correlation coefficient measures the proportion of variation in one variable that is explained by the other variable.
Correlated linear responses, proportion of variation due to selection ([R.
This percentage was between 45% (Hanson, Capraro, & Capraro, in press) and 52% (Hanson & Roberts, in press), which represents the average proportion of variation explained by extracted factors in educational and psychological research studies, respectively.
A high proportion of variation in DP loads was explained by simple empirical variables.
For many decades, researchers have been using family pedigree, adoption, and twin designs to tease apart the proportion of variation in IQ that is due to shared environmental influences, nonshared environmental influences, and genetic influences (see Bouchard & McGue, 1981; Plomin, 1990; and Rowe, 1994, for reviews).
The proportion of variation in seed weight that was attributable to site, shrubs, and within-shrub, was remarkably similar to that found in other species.
Wetstein also, in my view, expresses an excessively positivist view of "explanation," equating it with proportion of variation explained or goodness of (empirical) fit.