Subunit

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subunit

[′səb‚yü·nət]
(biochemistry)

Subunit

 

a military element with a permanent organization and uniform composition that is organic to a larger subunit or military unit. A squad, platoon, company (battery or flight), and battalion (squadron) are all subunits unless they are separate.

References in periodicals archive ?
GEN-003 is a first-in-class, protein subunit, therapeutic T cell vaccine intended to reduce recurrence and transmission of Herpes Simplex Virus type 2 (HSV-2).
Effects of microwave irradiation on electrophoretic profiles of CS protein subunits
One stage in this cycle is the virus particle or virion, which is characterized by intrinsic properties such as size, mass, chemical composition, nucleotide sequence of the genome, and amino acid sequence of protein subunits, among others.
Scientists have known for years that potassium channels are composed of four identical protein subunits that form a complex.
But the shell is non-uniform and asymmetrical; uncertainty remained about the exact number of proteins involved and how the hexagons of six protein subunits and pentagons of five subunits are joined.
Immunization with H pylori protein subunits in humans has shown adjuvant-related adverse effects and only moderate effectiveness.
Although the contributing factors to these discrepancies are not fully understood, the source of soybeans and processing procedures of the protein or ISF are believed to be important because of their effects on the content and intactness of certain bioactive protein subunits.
The protein subunits were fractionated by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) as described by Laemmli (1970).
This is a large hollow cylinder formed from 28 protein subunits in stacked rings with 'caps' at each end (Figure 2).
The researchers broke the virus apart chemically and extracted the spilled RNA, then allowed the protein subunits to reassemble into a sphere with a cavity 18 nanometers in diameter.
Each strand consists of a chain of protein subunits linked end-to-end like the cars of a train.
Using advanced imaging techniques, we have uncovered for the first time the structure of an S-layer in remarkable detail showing that the protein subunits are linked together in a manner resembling a chainmail.