PEM

(redirected from Protein-Energy Malnutrition)
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Related to Protein-Energy Malnutrition: protein calorie malnutrition

PEM

PEM

(Privacy Enhanced Mail) A standard for secure e-mail on the Internet. It supports encryption, digital signatures and digital certificates as well as both private and public key methods. Not widely used, work on PEM later evolved into S/MIME. See MIME.
References in periodicals archive ?
26) identified extensive misclassification of AIDS deaths to indicator conditions including protein-energy malnutrition in the year 2000.
Rapid-turnover transport proteins: an index of subclinical protein-energy malnutrition.
Although their liquid consistency makes them easy to consume, the volumes needed to meet infant energy and nutrient requirements often exceed the maximum volume the infant can ingest; and this may lead to inadequate nutrient intakes; hence, protein-energy malnutrition.
Limited value of serum ferritin in evaluating iron status in children with protein-energy malnutrition.
Friedman JF, Kwena A, Mirel LB, Kariuki SK, Terlouw DJ, Phillips-Howard PA, Hawley WA, Nahlen BL, Ya Ping Shi and FO Ter Kuile Risk factors for Protein-Energy Malnutrition among young children in an area of intense perennial malaria transmission in Western Kenya: Results of cross sectional survey.
These definitions are designed principally in relation to clinical syndromes of primary protein-energy malnutrition seen in paediatric populations in developing countries and are not easily applied to the hospitalised adult population in industrialised countries (2).
Protein-energy malnutrition (PEM) is a serious clinical condition with high prevalence in areas where malaria tropica (plasmodium falciparum) is highly endemic such as western Kenya [1].
In addition, low birth weight, protein-energy malnutrition, anemia and iodine deficiency reduce children's ability to learn.
To the Editor: The association between protein-energy malnutrition (PEM) and dysphagia is well recognised--dysphagia, if not managed, can lead to PEM.
His current research interests include Protein-Energy Malnutrition and malaria in children, Aflatoxin and Fumonisin contamination as factors in growth retardation, HIV-AIDS and malnutrition in children, Isoenzymes as tools in disease diagnosis and the role of vitamins A and E in disease diagnosis.
The term malnutrition includes both protein-energy malnutrition and the lack of specific nutrients.
The most serious nutritional deficiency in infants and young children is protein-energy malnutrition (PEM), which contributes to more than 50% of childhood mortality in developing countries [8, 9].

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