Proudhon


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Related to Proudhon: Kropotkin

Proudhon

Pierre Joseph . 1809--65, French socialist, whose pamphlet What is Property? (1840) declared that property is theft
References in periodicals archive ?
Clark, The Philosophical Anarchism of William Godwin (Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1977); George Crowder, Classical Anarchism: The Political Thought of Godwin, Proudhon, Bakunin, and Kropotkin (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1991).
See also Pierre-Joseph Proudhon, "Les Majorats litteraires," trans.
Pierre Joseph Proudhon, Qu'est-ce que la Propriete?
He engaged in a debate on the justification of interest with Pierre Proudhon (Bastiat, 1873b; Mulberger, 1896), was a friend of Cobden and Bright (Bastiat, 1864; Russell, 1959) and tried to do for free trade in France what Cobden and Bright did in England (Bastiat, 1864; Roche, 1971).
13) Proudhon, who was not a student of Aristotle, discusses in similar terms the communism of Cabot.
Proudhon rejected the notion of improving state structures in favour of abolishing them.
For in mid-nineteenth-century France, in the novels of Balzac, where characters habitually voice anti-Jewish feelings; in the Journal d'un poete of Alfred de Vigny, where Jews are variously excoriated and blamed for the ills of society; in the writings of Pierre-Joseph Proudhon, where the notion of the extermination of the Jews can occur as an indifferent aside; (62) in the entries on "juif" in the exalted space of the dictionaries of the Academie francaise, where the 1835 edition defines the word as "he who practices usury or sells at exorbitant prices," and where the 1836 supplement offers the neologism "juiver" for "to cheat in a deal," Jews were readily and widely associated with the evils of capitalism, banking, and moneylending.
Commons (1934: 131) writes that 'from John Locke to Adam Smith, to Ricardo, Proudhon and Karl Marx, it is possible to build a whole system of political economy on the one foundation of labor.
The 19th century French philosopher Pierre-Joseph Proudhon once referred to laws as spider webs for the rich and chains for the poor.
Sowell distinguishes Marx's concept from his contemporary, the socialist politician, Ferdinand Lassalle's notion of the "iron law of wages," and follows by drawing a further distinction between Marx and his close collaborator Frederick Engels with respect to Marx's treatment of the "wage minimum" in Marx's 1847 critique of French utopian socialist Pierre Proudhon, Poverty of Philosophy.
Though he cites classical secular anarchists like Bakunin, Proudhon, and Kropotkin, he does so merely as a prop for "Christian anarchism" (xiii).