Psamtik

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Psamtik

(säm`tĭk, săm`–), Lat. Psammetichus, d. 609 B.C., king of ancient Egypt, founder of the XXVI dynasty. When his father, NechoNecho
, fl. 670 B.C., lord of Saïs, Egypt. He was confirmed in his holding after the Assyrian conquest in 670; he was later taken to Nineveh in chains for plotting to revolt but was pardoned and restored. He probably fell opposing (663) the Nubian reconquest under Tanutamon.
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, lord of Saïs under the Assyrians, was defeated and killed (663 B.C.), by the Nubian Tanutamon, Psamtik fled to his overlord, AssurbanipalAssurbanipal
or Ashurbanipal
, d. 626? B.C., king of ancient Assyria (669–633 B.C.), son and successor of Esar-Haddon. The last of the great kings of Assyria, he drove Taharka out of Egypt and firmly established Necho in power there only to have Necho's son
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, who reinstated (661) him at Saïs as viceroy of Lower Egypt. While Assurbanipal was busy in Babylonia and other regions, Psamtik shook off his Assyrian allegiance and became master of all Egypt. During his long and eminently prosperous reign, he encouraged the settlement (especially at Naucratis) of Greek soldiers and traders, who for the first time became important in Egypt. His incursion into Palestine was stopped by the Scythians. His son was the pharaoh NechoNecho
, 609–593 B.C., king of ancient Egypt, 2d ruler of the XXVI dynasty, the son and successor of Psamtik and grandson of Necho, lord of Saïs. Necho took advantage of the confusion that followed the fall of Nineveh (612) to invade Palestine and Syria, both of which
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.
References in classic literature ?
The second that we shall mention is the tyranny of the Cypselidse, at Corinth, which continued seventy-seven years and six months; for Cypselus was tyrant there thirty years, Periander forty-four, and Psammetichus, the son of Georgias, three years; the reason for which was, that Cypselus was a popular man, and governed without guards.
Schmitz raises interesting questions about Greek perception of the non-Greek ethnic groups involved in the campaign (see also "The Phoenician Contingent in the Campaign of Psammetichus against Kush," Journal of Egyptian History 3 [2010]: 321-37).
King Psammetichus I, the first ruler of the 26th Dynasty (664-625 B.
The text for Proper 6 follows a section in which the word of the Lord inspired Ezekiel to "propound a riddle, and speak an allegory to the house of Israel" (17:2) about an eagle (Nebuchadnezzar) who takes the topmost shoot (Jehoiachin) of the cedar (Lebanon) and transplants it--where it becomes a vine that then stretches towards another eagle (the pharaoh, Psammetichus II).
The smaller of the two obelisks was originally erected and dedicated to Pharaoh Psammetichus II who reigned from 595-589 BC.
The second example is similar; Psammetichus of Egypt commanded some Ionian and Carian men to look after some Egyptian children and teach them the Greek language ([TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII.
Frank Salmon's pursuit of Stuart's trail in Florence and Rome, unpicking his involvement (in the form of engraved illustrations and a supplementary 16,000 word archaeological analysis in Italian and Latin) in the publication of De Obelisco Caesaris Augusti, which documents the celebrated excavation in Rome of the ancient Egyptian obelisk of Psammetichus II, is revelatory and signals Stuart's perspicacity and intellectual flexibility.
evidence, that the rope that Psammetichus uses in sounding the Nile at
It presumably also underlies experiments like that attributed to King Psammetichus of Egypt, who, as related by Herodotus, caused two children to be reared in isolation to see which language they would end up speaking; this presupposes that they would end up speaking a human language, though going further in also presupposing that there is some particular language -- according to Herodotus, their first word was the Phrygian for `bread' -- that they would speak as default.
At the of his long reign, in September 604, Psammetichus handed an independent and essentially prosperous country to his son Necho, and all seemed well.
Less wellknown than the Tower of Babel story, it purports to give the results of an experiment into the origin of language by the Egyptian ruler, Psammetichus.
Note that there was a historical Petese son of Onchsheshonqy of Heracleopolis, who married into the Saite royal family and governed from Memphis to Aswan until he retired in the fourth regnal year of Psammetichus I.