Pterygota


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Pterygota

 

the most extensive group of higher insects, including both winged and wingless individuals. In some species, wings develop in the adult stage even though they do not perform the function of flying. A group of Pterygota have wings that are somewhat reduced or absent. Thus, Pterygota includes the bedbug, which is wingless, and the order Hemiptera, which has many species with developed wings. Some species have lost their wings as an adaptation to a specific way of life; however, the structure of their respiratory system, their developmental cycle (fleas), the structure of their mouthparts (bird lice, true lice), and other characters are similar to those of winged insects. Pterygota are marked by a somewhat complex postembryonic development (metamorphosis). They may be divided into two groups—those having incomplete metamorphosis and those having complete metamorphosis.

References in periodicals archive ?
Pterygota, koto, ware, awari, kefe, poroposo, African pterygota, African chesnut
African pterygota is the name given to two closely related species, Pterygota bequaertii and Pterygota macrocarpa.
A name used frequently for the two species is koto, though some reference books make the distinction of calling Pterygota bequaertii trees koto and Pterygota macrocarpa trees kefe, ware or poroposo.
The average weight for trees from the species Pterygota macrocarpa is 35 pounds per cubic feet when seasoned.
9% of all insects belong to the "winged" superorder, Pterygota, many genera are composed of species that are dimorphic for wing length or monomorphically wingless (for reviews, see Thayer 1992; Roff 1994a).
The extinctorder Caloneurodea (Insecta, Pterygota, Panorthoptera): wingvenation, systematics, and phylogenetic relationships.
2004): The extinct order Caloneurodea (Insecta, Pterygota, Panorthoptera): wing venation, systematics, and phylogenetic relationships.